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If there was ever a city that could rival Paris at night it would be London. With more historical wonders per square mile than anywhere in the world* London makes for some fantastic visuals at night.

Big Ben at night

Big Ben is the nickname for the great bell of the clock at the north end of the Palace of Westminster in London, and often extended to refer to the clock and the clock tower, officially named Elizabeth Tower, as well. Elizabeth Tower holds the largest four-faced chiming clock in the world and is the third-tallest free-standing clock tower. It celebrated its 150th anniversary on 31 May 2009, during which celebratory events took place. The tower was completed in 1858 and has become one of the most prominent symbols of London, England and Great Britain, often in the establishing shot of films set in the city. [Photo via Shutterstock, Shutterstock and Shutterstock]

Tower Bridge at night

Tower Bridge (built 1886–1894) is a combined bascule and suspension bridge in London, over the River Thames. It is close to the Tower of London, from which it takes its name.  It has become an iconic symbol of London. Tower Bridge is sometimes mistakenly referred to as London Bridge, which is the next bridge upstream. [Photo via Shutterstock, Shutterstock and Shutterstock]

Houses of Parliament at night

The Palace of Westminster is the meeting place of the House of Commons and the House of Lords, the two houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Commonly known as the Houses of Parliament after its tenants, the Palace lies on the Middlesex bank of the River Thames in the City of Westminster, in central London. Its name, which derives from the neighbouring Westminster Abbey, may refer to either of two structures: the Old Palace, a medieval building complex that was destroyed by fire in 1834, and its replacement New Palace that stands today. For ceremonial purposes, the palace retains its original style and status as a royal residence.

The Palace is one of the centres of political life in the United Kingdom; “Westminster” has become a metonym for the UK Parliament, and the Westminster system of government has taken its name after it. The Elizabeth Tower, in particular, which is often referred to by the name of its main bell, “Big Ben”, is an iconic landmark of London and the United Kingdom in general, one of the most popular tourist attractions in the city and an emblem of parliamentary democracy. The Palace of Westminster has been a Grade I listed building since 1970 and part of a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1987. [Photo via Shutterstock, Shutterstock and Shutterstock]

Westminster Abbey at night

Westminster Abbey, is a large, mainly Gothic church, in the City of Westminster, London, located just to the west of the Palace of Westminster. It is the traditional place of coronation, royal weddings like Prince William and Kate Middletown and burial site for most Kings and Queens but also well-known people like Geoffrey Chaucer, Isaac Newton, and Charles Darwin. [Photo via Shutterstock]

The London Eye at night

The London Eye is a giant Ferris wheel situated on the banks of the River Thames in London, England. The entire structure is 135 metres (443 ft) tall and the wheel has a diameter of 120 metres (394 ft).
It is the tallest Ferris wheel in Europe, and the most popular paid tourist attraction in the United Kingdom, visited by over 3.5 million people annually.[4] When erected in 1999 it was the tallest Ferris wheel in the world. [Photo via Shutterstock and Shutterstock]

Double Decker tour buses

[Photo via Shutterstock]

Buckingham Palace at night

Buckingham Palace is the official London residence and principal workplace of the British monarch. Located in the City of Westminster, the palace is a setting for state occasions and royal hospitality. It has been a focus for the British people at times of national rejoicing and crisis.
Originally known as Buckingham House, the building which forms the core of today’s palace was a large townhouse built for the Duke of Buckingham in 1705 on a site which had been in private ownership for at least 150 years. The original early 19th-century interior designs, many of which still survive, included widespread use of brightly coloured scagliola and blue and pink lapis, on the advice of Sir Charles Long. King Edward VII oversaw a partial redecoration in a Belle Époque cream and gold colour scheme. Many smaller reception rooms are furnished in the Chinese regency style with furniture and fittings brought from the Royal Pavilion at Brighton and from Carlton House. The Buckingham Palace Garden is the largest private garden in London. [Photo via Shutterstock]

Ornamental gate at Buckingham Palace

[Photo via Shutterstock]

Piccadilly Circus at night

Piccadilly Circus is a road junction and public space of London’s West End in the City of Westminster, built in 1819 to connect Regent Street with the major shopping street of Piccadilly. In this context, a circus, from the Latin word meaning “circle”, is a round open space at a street junction.

Piccadilly now links directly to the theatres on Shaftesbury Avenue, as well as the Haymarket, Coventry Street (onwards to Leicester Square), and Glasshouse Street. The Circus is close to major shopping and entertainment areas in the West End. Its status as a major traffic intersection has made Piccadilly Circus a busy meeting place and a tourist attraction in its own right. [Photo via Shutterstock]

London eye, County Hall, Westminster Bridge, Big Ben and Houses of Parliament

[Photo via Shutterstock]

St Paul’s Cathedral at night

St Paul’s Cathedral, London, is a Church of England cathedral and seat of the Bishop of London. Its dedication to Paul the Apostle dates back to the original church on this site, founded in AD 604. St Paul’s sits at the top of Ludgate Hill, the highest point in the City of London. The present church dating from the late 17th century was built to an English Baroque design of Sir Christopher Wren, as part of a major rebuilding program which took place in the city after the Great Fire of London, and was completed within his lifetime.

The cathedral is one of the most famous and most recognisable sights of London, with its dome, framed by the spires of Wren’s City churches, dominating the skyline for 300 years. At 365 feet (111 m) high, it was the tallest building in London from 1710 to 1962, and its dome is also among the highest in the world. In terms of area, St Paul’s is the second largest church building in the United Kingdom after Liverpool Cathedral.

St Paul’s Cathedral occupies a significant place in the national identity of the English population. Important services held at St Paul’s include the funerals of Lord Nelson, the Duke of Wellington and Sir Winston Churchill; Jubilee celebrations for Queen Victoria; peace services marking the end of the First and Second World Wars; the wedding of Charles, Prince of Wales, and Lady Diana Spencer, the launch of the Festival of Britain and the thanksgiving services for the Golden Jubilee, the 80th Birthday and the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II. [Photo via Shutterstock]

Leadenhall Market at night

[Photo via Shutterstock]

Millennium Bridge at night

The Millennium Bridge is a steel suspension bridge for pedestrians crossing the River Thames in London, England, linking Bankside with the City. The southern end of the bridge is near Globe Theatre, the Bankside Gallery and Tate Modern, the north end next to the City of London School below St Paul’s Cathedral. The bridge alignment is such that a clear view of St Paul’s south facade is presented from across the river, framed by the bridge supports. The bridge has two river piers and is made of three main sections of 81 metres (266 ft), 144 metres (472 ft) and 108 metres (354 ft) (North to South) with a total structure length of 325 metres (1,066 ft); the aluminium deck is 4 metres (13 ft) wide. [Photo via Shutterstock and Shutterstock]

The National Gallery at Trafalgar Square at night

The National Gallery is an art museum on Trafalgar Square, London. Founded in 1824, it houses a collection of over 2,300 paintings dating from the mid-13th century to 1900. The Gallery is an exempt charity, and a non-departmental public body of the Department for Culture, Media and Sport. Its collection belongs to the public of the United Kingdom and entry to the main collection is free of charge. It is the fourth most visited art museum in the world, after the Musée du Louvre, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the British Museum. [Photo via Shutterstock]

Trafalgar Square at night

[Photo via Shutterstock]

The Royal Albert Hall at night

Since its opening by Queen Victoria in 1871, the world’s leading artists from several performance genres have appeared on Royal Albert Hall’s stage and it has become one of the UK’s most treasured and distinctive buildings .[Photo via Shutterstock]

Chinatown and Soho at night

[Photo via Shutterstock]

Big Ben, the House of Parliament and the Westminster Bridge at night

[Photo via Shutterstock]

Harrods in the Brompton Road

[Photo via Shutterstock]

Bank Of England

The Bank of England, formally the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, is the central bank of theUnited Kingdom and the model on which most modern central banks have been based. Established in 1694, it is the second oldest central bank in the world, after the Sveriges Riksbank, and the world’s 8th oldest bank. It was established to act as the English Government’s banker, and to this day it still acts as the banker for HM Government.

[Photo via Shutterstock]

* made up fact but it could be true.

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