Remembering Heroic Navy SEAL Charlie Keating

Charles H. Keating IV grew up in a family of war heroes, with great-grandfather Charles Keating serving in World War I and grandfather, Charles Keating Jr., a naval pilot in World War II. So it was no surprise when the high school track star decided to defend his country following the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

Charlie Keating, known as “C-4,” served as a Navy SEAL and was initially deployed to the American-led intervention in Iraq, supporting Iraqi Kurdistan’s Peshmerga forces in an advise and assist mission in a 30-man unit. On May 3, 2016, Charlie was shot and killed by Islamic State militants during an assault on a Peshmerga position approximately 3 to 5 kilometers behind enemy lines, near the town of Tel Asqof, 28-30km north of Mosul.

From Wikipedia:

Keating IV was part of a nearly 20-man QRF that was sent to rescue a dozen U.S. advisors and to assist the Peshmerga, during the battle the SEALs ran low on ammunition and Keating’s machine gun malfunctioned so he went back to a nearby coalition vehicle to get a new weapon and additional ammunition. Keating, now armed with a sniper rifle, climbed on top of a building and began firing on the ISIS fighters. It was at this point that Keating was struck by enemy fire, he was medevac’d to a hospital where he was declared dead.

One year after his death, Charlie Keating is still remembered by those he fought to protect. His mother, Krista Keating-Joseph, has even turned his inspiring story into a children’s book, Big-Hearted Charlie Runs The Mile, available via Amazon.

"A year ago today Navy SEAL Charlie H Keating IV (C4) lost his life fighting evil and protecting innocent lives on the front lines of Iraq. He was sleeveless and fearless and was full of Aloha. He would receive the Silver Star and Silver Cross during his deployments. He will always be remembered as a legend. In his memory the @chkivfoundation was formed in reaction of the overwhelming love and support that permeated the community. It will serve as a beacon to those that knew him and a testament to those that did not. To support the Foundations efforts @URTURT has designed a collection for sale where the proceeds will go directly to @chkivfoundation as they set out on their mission. Please support them along the way. #chuckheavy" #LLTB

A post shared by Green Eyed Devils (@green_eyed_devils) on

Master Shredder. #CHUCKHEAVY

A post shared by Charlie Keating IV Foundation (@chkivfoundation) on

A year ago today Navy SEAL Charlie H Keating IV (C4) lost his life fighting evil and protecting innocent lives on the front lines of Iraq. He was sleeveless and fearless and was full of Aloha. He would receive the Silver Star and Silver Cross during his deployments. He will always be remembered as a legend. In his memory the @chkivfoundation was formed in reaction of the overwhelming love and support that permeated the community. It will serve as a beacon to those that knew him and a testament to those that did not. To support the Foundations efforts @URTURT has designed a collection for sale where the proceeds will go directly to @chkivfoundation as they set out on their mission. Please support them along the way. #chuckheavy

A post shared by SEAL/ SWCC Pictures And Videos (@navy.seals.swcc) on

More in America

21 Powerful Photos Of The D-Day Invasion

More than 160,000 Allied troops landed along a 50-mile stretch of heavily-fortified French coastline on June 6, 1944. The largest amphibious operation in history, “D-Day” saw more than 5,000 Ships and 13,000 aircraft, descend upon Nazi-occupied France. By the end of the day, the Allies had gained a foot-hold in…

D-Day By The Numbers [Infographic]

On Tuesday, June 6, 1944, Allied forces invaded Normandy in Operation Overlord during World War II. Forever known as D-Day, the operation was the largest seaborne invasion in history. But just how big was it? In total, 156,000 Allied troops, 5,000 ships and landing craft, 50,000 vehicles, 11,000 aircraft and…

25 Photos Honoring The USS Independence

The USS Independence (CV/CVA-62) was the fourth and final member of the Forrestal class of conventionally powered supercarriers when she was commissioned in 1959. President Kennedy called on her to serve as a reminder of US resolve as part of the Naval blockade of Cuba during the Cuban Missile Crisis…

error: