NASA And NOAA Share Insane Photos Of Hurricane Harvey As Seen From Space

On Friday, August 25, category 4 hurricane Harvey struck the southeast coast of Texas. As of Monday evening, parts of Texas were reporting more than 40 inches of rainfall as Harvey slowly makes its way to Louisiana, where another 10 to 20 inches are expected to fall thru Thursday. The storm has shattered rainfall records, with 15 trillion gallons of water dropped on Texas thus far.

NASA and NOAA have been tracking the storm via GOES-16, a weather satellite launched in 2016. The satellite offers unprecedented sever storm tracking, a feature unfortunately showcased during the Harvey disaster. See the insane photos of Harvey below and donate to the American Red Cross to support hurricane victims at redcross.org or call 1- 800-RED CROSS or text the word HARVEY to 90999 to make a $10 donation.

GOES-16 captured this beautiful geocolor image of Tropical Storm Harvey in the Gulf of Mexico on the morning of August 24, 2017.
At the time, NOAA’s National Hurricane Center reported that Harvey, formerly a tropical depression, was located about 380 miles southeast of Port O’Connor, Texas, and moving toward the north-northwest near 10 miles per hour. Forecasters expect the storm to begin moving northwest or north-northwest at a faster forward speed over the next 48 hours.
Harvey’s maximum sustained winds have increased to near 60 mph with higher gusts. Additional strengthening is forecast during the next 48 hours, and Harvey is expected to become a hurricane by August 25. In addition, Harvey is expected to produce total rain accumulations of 10 to 15 inches with isolated maximum amounts of 25 inches over the Texas coast through August 30.
Credit: CIRA
On Aug. 24, the National Hurricane Center noted that Hurricane Harvey was quickly strengthening and is forecast to be a category 3 Hurricane when it approaches the middle Texas coast. In addition, life-threatening storm surge and freshwater flooding expected.
On Aug. 24, many warnings and watches were in effect: A Storm Surge Warning is in effect from Port Mansfield to San Luis Pass Texas. A Storm Surge Watch is in effect from south of Port Mansfield Texas to the mouth of the Rio Grande River and from north of San Luis Pass to High Island, Texas. A Hurricane Warning is in effect from Port Mansfield to Matagorda, Texas. A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect from north of Matagorda to High Island, Texas and south of Port Mansfield, Texas to the Mouth of the Rio Grande. A Hurricane Watch is in effect from south of Port Mansfield, Texas to the Mouth of the Rio Grande. A Tropical Storm Watch is in effect from south of the mouth of the Rio Grande to Boca de Catan, Mexico.
GOES-16 captured this geocolor image of Tropical Storm Harvey in the Gulf of Mexico this morning, August 24, 2017. Geocolor imagery enhancement shown here displays geostationary satellite data in different ways depending on whether it is day or night. This image, captured as daylight moves into the area, offers a blend of both, with nighttime features on the left side of the image and daytime on the right.
Credit: NOAA/NASA GOES Project
Astronaut Randy Bresnik took this photo of Tropical Storm Harvey from the International Space Station on Aug. 28 at 1:27 p.m. CDT.
GOES-16 captured this geocolor image of Tropical Storm Harvey centered over the Gulf of Mexico just before 8:00 a.m. (CDT) on August 29, 2017.
As of 7:00 a.m. CDT on August 29, NOAA’s National Hurricane Center reported that Harvey, was located about 90 miles east-southeast of Port O’Connor, Texas, and moving toward the north-northeast near 3 miles per hour. This motion is expected to continue throughout the morning and then a turn toward the northeast is expected later today or tonight, followed by a turn toward the north-northeast on Wednesday (8/30). On the forecast track, the center of Harvey is expected to be just offshore of the middle and upper coasts of Texas through tonight, then move inland over the northwestern Gulf coast on Wednesday. Harvey’s maximum sustained winds remain near 45 mph with higher gusts. Little change in strength is forecast during the next 48 hours.
Harvey is expected to produce additional rainfall accumulations of 7 to 13 inches through Friday (9/1) over parts of the upper Texas coast into southwestern Louisiana. Isolated storm totals may reach 50 inches over the upper Texas coast, including the Houston/Galveston metropolitan area. These rains are currently producing catastrophic and life-threatening flooding over large portions of southeastern Texas and southwestern Louisiana.