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  • 15 Secluded Get-Aways You’ll Wish Were Yours for LDW

    Hide and Seek: The Architecture of Cabins and Hide-Outs, a new book from Gestalten explores a rarely seen look at some of the most remote habitats of humans on the planet. Hide and seek features highly individual cabins, hideaways, and summer homes completely hidden from the lights, noise and chaos of urban civilization. These imaginative structures meld traditional architecture with modern living in fascinating and surprising ways. Whether located in the forest, on the water, or in the mountains the homes incorporate their natural surroundings as part of the structures integrity.   

  • Bushcraft 101: Your Essential Wilderness Survival Guide

    Whether you’re camping with a few pals or testing yourself alone in the wilderness against the elements, it always helps to be knowledgable of your surroundings and keeping in mind the 5C’s; cutting tools, covering, combustion devices, containers, and cordages. Dave Canterbury co-owner and supervising instructor at the Pathfinder School in Ohio, one of the best survival schools in the world, recently released a new book teaching his methods and instruction on survival. From building out your kit to manufacturing tools and supplies to food collection to cooking and protection from the elements Canterbury covers everything. His YouTube channel has more than 200,000 subscribers and his videos have more than 34 million views, so you know his methods and tactics speak for themselves. Bushcraft 101

  • Ice-T Joined An All-Star Cast In Narrating A Dungeons & Dragons Book

    The fantasy world of Dungeons & Dragons, encompassing numerous games and books, celebrates it’s 40th birthday this year, but chances are that you, a Level 10 Cool Dude, had no idea. For so many years, it seemed like the people interested in Dungeons & Dragons, or D&D, were the sort of people who carried tarot cards in velvet satchels in middle school converted to Wicca in high school. But, as nerd culture becomes increasingly usurped by trendsetters, thanks to the success of the Lord of the Rings Trilogy and Tumblrs featuring bikini-clad babes wearing stormtrooper helmets, D&D-ers can now be found in many cliques. To celebrate the anniversary of D&D while also highlighting the mainstream-ing of nerd culture, Audible has released The Legend of Drizzt: The Collected Stories, featuring an all-star cast of narrators. Nerd icons such as Weird Al, David Duchovny, and Wil Wheaton read the stories but are also joined by celebrities you may not expect, such as rapper Ice-T and Michael Chiklis of The Shield. Check out the making-of video below and if you’re ready to dive in to the world of D&D, get your free copy of The Legend of Drizzt at Audible. And if anyone asks more »

  • Chuck Palahniuk Announces A Fight Club 2 Comic Book Series

    I am Jacks elated sense of excitement. Luminous author, Chuck Palahniuk has announced he’ll be giving his most acclaimed work, Fight Club a resurgence in the form of a 10-issue maxiseries comic. The series will be under Dark Horse Comics and will be illustrated by Cameron Stewart. Palahniuk will be talking in more detail at a Fight Club Comic-Con panel later this week, but has already announced a release date for May 2015. “Fight Club 2 takes place alternately in the future and the past. It picks up a decade after the ending of his original book, where the protagonist is married to equally problematic Marla Singer and has a 9 year-old son named Junior, though the narrator is failing his son in the same way his dad failed him.” In a USA Today interview, Palahniuk teased the return of everyone’s favourite hyper-violent id: “Tyler Durden is something that maybe has been around for centuries and is not just this aberration that’s popped into his mind.” Project Mayhem will also play a critical part in the comics, possibly using Junior as a catalyst for the protagonists return to the organization. Read the full interview here.

  • Get Help Choosing A Summer Book With This Infographic

    Now that summer’s here, chances are you’ll be spending a lot of time sitting around at the beach or at a park, working on your tan. As tempting as it is to sit and stare into nothingness a la David Putty, it just may be a better idea to grab a book. And we’re not talking about airport novels from Dan Brown or James Patterson (as enjoyable as they are). There are millions of books you’re missing out on and choosing one can be a daunting task. So use this chart and find yourself the perfect novel this summer. You may even enjoy it so much, you’ll come back to find another choice. 

  • Glow: The Autobiography of Rick James [Book]

    The late Rick James was made wildly relevant again through the eyes of the Chapelle Show and even after his passing has remained familiar through an older generation of fans of his music and a younger one familiar with the hit tv show alike. James was best known for his funk hit “Super Freak”, but was also an acclaimed producer and award-winning pioneer in the fusion of funk groove and rock. Pre-2004 James partnered with biographer David Ritz to give readers an in depth no holds barred look into the life of a man with the ultimate rock star life. Sex, Drugs and Funk. Glow: The Autobiography of Rick James

  • 17 Photos Of “Fancy Cycling” Tricks From 1901

    Although initially developed in the mid-1800s, the bicycle as we know it today really took off in the 1890s, thanks to the invention of the pneumatic tire and rear freewheel. The bicycle craze took hold across Europe and America and it was only a matter of time before old-timey daredevils were doing tricks that would curl your mustache. In 1901, “Fancy Cycling” by Isabel Marks was published. The book featured photos of unenthusiastic Edwardian socialites engaging in all manner of cycling shenanigans. The book was republished last year and is available on Amazon.

  • Brilliant Book Satirizes Children’s Books And Modern Art

    Even people who appreciate modern art have had those moments staring at Jackson Pollock’s paint drips or Mark Rothko’s rectangles and thought “Really? Well I could have done that!” Or stood in an empty room doubling as an art installation where the art was the absence of art and wondered if someone was just screwing with you. Artist Miriam Elia satirizes these moments and many others in her book “We Go to the Gallery.” The book features Peter, Jane, and Mummy, stars of the popular 1960s British children’s book series Peter and Jane. The book itself can be seen as postmodern piece that comments on modern and postmodern art. Penguin, the British publisher who claims copyright ownership of the Peter and Jane series tried to get force Elia to destroy the first run and halt further printings, but she has not backed down. The second print run is on the way and you can get more updates at Learning with Miriam.

  • German Cautionary Tales Have Been Scaring Children For 170 Years

    In the 1840s, German psychiatrist Heinrich Hoffmann went to buy his son a book for Christmas, but couldn’t find any stories suitable. Apparently, the fairy tales of fellow creepy Germans the Brothers Grimm, which often end with the deaths of children, were too namby pamby for Hoffmann’s three-year-old son. He decided to write and illustrate his own children’s book and “Struwwelpeter” was born. Hoffmann believed that children’s books should teach children how to behave or else face dire consequences. And he didn’t mean be nice or go to bed without dessert. Hoffmann’s tales were more like eat your soup or starve to death. Or don’t play with matches or you’ll burn to death. Or don’t suck your thumbs or else you’ll get them cut off with giant scissors from a perv who follows little boys around. He even tackled race relations in the book: a group of boys who picked on the only black boy in town were dipped in ink for punishment. Huh. In the years since its initial publication, “Struwwelpeter” has been published all over the world and adapted for stage and film. British musical trio The Tiger Lillies composed and performed music for a stage version in 1998 called more »

  • 15 Photos Of Literature’s Most Memorable Meals

    Designer and art director Dinah Fried first came up with the idea for her book Fictitious Dishes: An Album of Literature’s Most Memorable Meals while a student at Rhode Island School of Design. Originally just 5 photographs of meals described in famous works of literature, Fired eventually prepared and photographed 50 meals for the book. Each photo is accompanied with the description from the novel along with anecdotes about the authors and their works. 15 of the photos are presented below, but to see the rest, order your copy of Fictitious Dishes. The series is pretty great, but Fried should try tackling one of the banquets from a Brian Jacques “Redwall” novel. What literary meal would you like to see photographed?

  • Haute Dogs [Book]

    Everyone’s favorite summer meal, the Hot Dog has been a staple in American history since George crossed the Delaware. “Haute Dogs” is a collection of recipes stretched from Mexican influenced to Japanese fusion. Of course they also have plenty of modern and classic American dog recipes as well. With over 100 recipes and 168 pages of Hot diggity dog summer goodness, “Haute Dogs” is worth a glance to spice up your boring summer barbecue. Haute Dogs

  • The monoliths: 17 supercomputers from the ’60s [Link]

    A new era in techonolgy began when Seymour Cray developed the CDC 6600 in 1964. 10 times faster than any other computer at the time, the 6600 was dubbed a “supercomputer.” The original supercomputers cost $8 million each, but scientists hoped to cure the world’s ills with the devices. Many science fiction authors, however, took a more macabre approach, believing the supercomputers to turn on us and ultimately bring about our doom. Learn about 17 nefarious computers who wanted to destroy us then realize that your smartphone has more computing power than anything from 50 years ago…

  • The Incredible Loads Of Vietnamese Motorbikes [10 Photos]

    With tons of people traveling on very narrow roads, motorbikes are the most common mode of transportation on Vietnamese streets. Whereas Americans find the need to drive gigantic SUVs and pickup trucks to transport absolutely nothing, the Vietnamese do the exact opposite, overloading their little bikes to an absurd degree. Photographer Hans Kemp moved to Ho Chi Minh City in 1995 and in 2000 was commissioned to capture photos of the city’s motorbike culture. He was enamored with the insane amount of all sorts of objects on the tiny bikes and spent the next two years photographing as many as he could. The collection became a book titled “Bikes of Burden.” Kemp recently returned to city for a revised edition to his book. He found that although the streets have widened, the bike culture is just as prevalent, with immense loads as abundant as ever. Order the new edition of “Bikes of Burden” for $24.

  • The Old-Fashioned: The Story of the World’s First Classic Cocktail

    No better feeling then walking up to a crowded bar, lifting your hand, finger pointed to the sky grabbing the attention of the bartender, ordering an old fashioned, then getting the look of approval from everyone in the bar before they lift you up on to their shoulders in celebration for ordering the perfect drink. Oh that doesn’t happen at your local watering hole? The old fashioned is one if not the most iconic drink of the past century. It looks good, taste good and just sounds good saying it. “The Old-Fashioned: The Story of the World’s First Classic Cocktail” is a catalogue highlighting the beloved cocktail with a rich history briefing and over 50 classic and contemporary variations of it. It is a necessary addition to any true whiskey- or cocktail-lover’s bookshelf, and destined to become a classic on par with its namesake beverage. The Old-Fashioned: The Story of the World’s First Classic Cocktail $12

  • 14 Amazing Color Photos From The Late 1800s

    Between 1888 and 1924, the Detroit Photographic Company produced these color tinted images of black and white and sepia photographs to be sold as postcards. Graphic designer, photographer, and collector Marc Walter has amassed one of the largest private collections of these vintage travel photographs and he recently joined forces with documentarian and author Sabine Arque for a 612-page hardcover titled “An American Odyssey.” The book features photos from New York’s bustling immigrant neighborhoods in the East to Gold Rush towns of the West. Order “An American Odyssey” in May for $200.

  • People Posing With All The Food They Eat In A Day [6 Photos]

    Award-winning photojournalist Peter Menzel examines the differences in diet the world over in his latest book, “What I Eat: Around the World in 80 Diets.” The book features both those who are active with healthy diets and those who lead a more sedentary existence and may not make the best eating choices. The dichotomy is a striking way for the reader to recognize the huge effect of diet and maybe make some changes in their own life. Along with the 80 profiles of people from 30 countries are calorie totals of their daily diet and essays form experts discussing the effects of diet on our personal health and the health of the planet. “What I Eat: Around the World in 80 Diets” is available now form Amazon for $30.

  • Vintage Beer: A Taster’s Guide to Brews That Improve over Time

    Patrick Dawson explains how exactly a cellar quality beer is distinguished and told apart from your everyday beer. Beer, like wine is made from a wide variety of ingredients some which age better than others. This book will let you know which beers could stand the test of time and what to look for when tasting vintage beers, and the fascinating science behind the aging process. Also included is a comprehensive buying guide to help you select already-aged beers to add to your collection. Vintage Beer: A Taster’s Guide to Brews That Improve over Time $11  

  • This Brilliant Kurt Vonnegut Masters Thesis Was Rejected Because it Looked Too Fun

    Legendary author, Kurt Vonnegut, known for his dark, but fulfilling work with sprinkles of satire and humor created a final thesis for his Masters at the University Chicago, but was rejected because he claimed the teacher thought “it was so simple and looked like too much fun.” Vonnegut was an anthropology student at the time, finishing up his final thesis which he would go on to note was his “prettiest contribution” to the culture which he would eventually thrive in publishing literary classics like “Slaughter House 5″, “Cats Cradle” and “Breakfast of Champions”. His theory was that the main character of every story has ups and downs throughout the duration of the piece which can be graphed revealing a visual “shape” of every story.

  • Scott Hocking Documents Detroit’s Bad Graffiti [25 Photos]

    Scott Hocking, a photographer and artist from Detroit, has captured the amazing artwork of the unknown street Picasso’s around his city in his collection titled “Bad Graffiti.” Everyone pays attention to the Banksys of the world, but how often does someone champion the dude who paints crude genitalia on abandoned buildings? Or how about “free balls in your mouth” written in giant cursive letters? Not even Magritte is so brilliant! Looking through these, I have a newfound appreciation for whoever draws the horrific vaginas all over the benches in Jersey City’s Exchange Place. Also check out the rest of the collection and other work from Scott Hocking.

  • 32 Hot Sauce Recipes to Sting Your Tastebuds (Book)

    Here are 32 recipes for making your own signature hot sauces, ranging from mild to blisteringly hot, as well as 60 recipes that use homemade or commercial hot sauces in everything from barbeque and Buffalo wings to bouillabaisse and black-bean soup. Hot Sauce!: Techniques for Making Signature Hot Sauces, with 32 Recipes to Get You Started $10

  • Where’d You Get Those? 10th Anniversary (Book)

    Bobbito Garcia is looked at as the Godfather of the sneakerhead. He’s been a follower of the style and life of sneakers since the ’60s and interviewed some of the best designers in the industry over the years. “Where’d You Get Those is a chronicle of the sneaker world from 1960-1987, a time where not only the style of sneaker was innovative, but the sneaker itself. Not the shoe itself, the word. Before the era of the Nike Waffle, the sneaker never existed. The only shoe people wore we’re basically brown pieces of leather flaps around a foot. Although the book has been out for years, the 10th anniversary edition Out of print for years, features 400 hundred iconic sneaker designs arranged in an illustrated, chronological format. Where’d You Get Those? $25.00

  • Postertext Transforms Classic Literature Into Text Art [15 Photos]

    Postertext takes your favorite works of classic literature and transforms them into minimalist works of art that perfectly capture the plot in a single picture made up entirely of the text from the novel. They have plenty available, sometimes with multiple images to choose from, that you can order as paper prints or on canvas. They’re also constantly coming up with new ones, so if you don’t see your favorite book, you can request it on a form on the site. See the entire selection at Postertext.

  • Unnecessarily Nefarious NRO Mission Emblems [14 Photos]

    The U.S. National Reconnaissance Office launched its latest spy satellite last week and also introduced the new emblem for the mission, a giant octopus with its tentacles reaching all over the Earth and text reading “nothing is beyond our reach.” Immediately people were developing conspiracy theories equating the NRO to some all-powerful New World Order. But the truth is, supervillain-esque emblems are nothing new for the NRO, an office that was established in 1960 but whose existence was not made public until 1992. The following is just a sample of some of the more evil and silly patches from over the years, but more from the NRO and other government organizations can be found in Trevor Paglen’s book, “I Could Tell You But Then You Would Have to be Destroyed by Me: Emblems from the Pentagon’s Black World.”

  • Tastosterone: The Cook Book for Men Who Don’t Know How to Cook

    New Jersey-based cook and blogger Debra Levy Picard has released the ultimate cookbook for men with Tastosterone. Not only does it feature over 100 recipes that even the most clueless man (or woman) can follow, Debra also includes photographs, tools, tips, and techniques to aid in the flawless execution of such recipes as “Man Quiche,” “Aunt Zuzu’s Fish Taco,” and “Chocolate Bomb.” Whether you’re a complete dunce in the kitchen or a seasoned veteran, you’re bound to get something out of this easy-to-follow collection of deliciousness. Order Tastosterone for $39.95 in print or $14.99 for the Kindle edition.

  • National Geographic Around the world in 125 years (Book)

    For five generations, National Geographic magazine has dazzled and educated people with its incredible photographs, illustrations, and gripping stories from the four corners of the earth. Combining travel, wildlife, science, history, culture, and conservation, the National Geographic Society’s trailblazing magazine has inspired millions of readers to explore and take an interest in the planet we inhabit. The prints are limited to 125,000 copies worldwide, but these amazing photos don’t come cheap, the entire three book collection is going for $500. Go ahead, your dad deserves it. National Geographic Around the world in 125 years  

  • NYC Basic Tips And Etiquette [16 Pictures]

    Earlier this year, we shared some of Nathan W. Pyle’s New York City tips in GIF form. The popularity of those brilliant graphics led to a book deal for Pyle and his “NYC Basic Tips and Etiquette” is set to be published in April of next year. The paperback can be pre-ordered now for $7.65 at Amazon. To hold us over until then, Pyle has been releasing pictures that didn’t make it into the final work on his Facebook page. We’ve got some of them below, but be sure to head to Pyle’s homepage for all the latest on the New York artist. 

  • Monsters: The 1985 Chicago Bears and the Wild Heart of Football [Book]

    They were the Bears shufflin’ crew, shufflin’ on down, doin’ it for you. They weren’t here to start no trouble, they were just here to do the Super Bowl shuffle. The 1985 Bears were one of the most iconic teams the NFL has ever seen. Who could forget Walter Peyton’s unique run? Or Jim McMahon’s bad-ass haircut and sunglasses? Or The Fridge’s fridge-ness? Together they only lost one game that season and brought Chicago the only Super Bowl win the city has ever seen. Now you can relive that amazing season with the once in a lifetime team that brought hope to the Windy City in Rich Cohen’s Monsters: The 1985 Chicago Bears and the Wild Heart of Football. With new interviews from the coaches and players that made it all happen, this memoir will awaken the fan in anyone. Monsters: The 1985 Chicago Bears and the Wild Heart of Football $18

  • Winter Cocktails (Book)

    You’re home, it’s cold, you throw a couple of logs in the fireplace or a couple of tires in the old garbage can blaze, now you need a drink. On the nights when straight russian vodka out of the bottle just wont cut it and you need a good cocktail recipe that accents the weather outside (frightfull) try these wintery drinks (delightful).  In Winter Cocktails, María del Mar Sacasa and Tara Striano share more than 50 recipes for cold-weather cocktails and mixed beverages, including mulled ciders, hot toddies, wine drinks, eggnogs, and punches; there are even chilled drinks made with a kick that’ll warm you right up. Winter Cocktails $15

  • The Kid: The Immortal Life of Ted Williams (Book)

    Williams was the best hitter to every play the game. His 1941 .406 batting average has not and may never be topped again. Even after an era plagued with the PEDs, Williams record remained in tact. Want to feel even more minuscule about yourself, Williams 500+ home runs would have been even higher if not for his nearly five year baseball hiatus in the prime of his career to serve as a Marine pilot in WWII and Korea. Born in 1918 in San Diego, Ted would spend most of his life disguising his Mexican heritage. During his 22 years with the Boston Red Sox, Williams electrified crowds across America–and shocked them, too: His notorious clashes with the press and fans threatened his reputation. Yet while he was a God in the batter’s box, he was profoundly human once he stepped away from the plate. His ferocity came to define his troubled domestic life. While baseball might have been straightforward for Ted Williams, life was not. THE KID is biography of the highest literary order, a thrilling and honest account of a legend in all his glory and human complexity. In his final at-bat, Williams hit a home run. Bradlee’s marvelous book clears the more »

  • Dr. J: The Autobiography (Book)

    With startling honesty and an unmistakable voice, Dr. J is a historic self-portrait of an American legend, Julius “The Doctor” Erving. With his flights of improvisation around the basket and his towering afro, Julius Erving became one of the most charismatic (and revolutionary) players basketball has ever known. But while the public has long revered this cultural icon, few have ever known of the double life of Julius Erving. Dr. J traces the inner lives of the nearly perfect player and the imperfect man—and how he has come to terms with both. Dr. J Autobiography $21.00

  • The Kings County Distillery Guide to Urban Moonshining

    A new generation of urban bootleggers is distilling whiskey at home, and cocktail enthusiasts have embraced the nuances of brown liquors. Written by the founders of Kings County Distillery, New York City’s first distillery since Prohibition, this spirited illustrated book explores America’s age-old love affair with whiskey. It begins with chapters on whiskey’s history and culture from 1640 to today, when the DIY trend and the classic cocktail craze have conspired to make it the next big thing. For those thirsty for practical information, the book next provides a detailed, easy-to-follow guide to safe home distilling, complete with a list of supplies, step-by-step instructions, and helpful pictures, anecdotes, and tips. The final section focuses on the contemporary whiskey scene, featuring a list of microdistillers, cocktail and food recipes from the country’s hottest mixologists and chefs, and an opinionated guide to building your own whiskey collection. Guide to Urban Moonshining $16

  • DC Comics Celebrates Superman’s 75th Anniversary with Animated Short

    From the creative minds of Zack Snyder (Man of Steel), Bruce Timm and produced by Warner Bros. Animation, this short follows Superman through the years, from his first appearance on the cover of Action Comics #1 to Henry Cavill in this year’s Man of Steel…all in two minutes. All aspects of the short are animated, but significant characteristics make it known that one Superman is Christopher Reeves and another Henry Cavill. With that the transition from Superman to Superman through the years flows well, bursting through the comics into a new era.

  • Nicholson: Jack Nicholson Biography (Book)

    For five decades, Jack Nicholson has been part of film history. His infamous roles in the film industry have made Jack not only one of the best in the biz, but undoubtedly the coolest man in hollywood. Even in his twilight years, Jack is still riding high, court side at every Lakers game. With twelve Oscar nominations to his credit and legendary roles in films like Easy Rider, Five Easy Pieces, Terms of Endearment, The Shining, and One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Nicholson creates original, memorable characters like no other actor of his generation. And his personal life has been no less of an adventure. Nicholson $15

  • The American Craft Beer Cookbook

    John Holl is an expert when it comes to all things beer. He writes about beer, he judges beer competitions, and he hosts a beer radio show. Some speculate he even breathes beer utilizing some sort of gill system. Now he has compiled 155 of his favorite recipes from brew pubs and fellow beer lovers that not only pair well with your favorite brew, but many also feature beer as an ingredient. There’s typical pub fare, such as Scotch Eggs and burgers, but also many recipes you may not expect, like Chopped Reuben Salad, Chocolate Jefferson Stout Cupcakes, and Beer Floats (trust us, they’re delicious!). Also, each recipe has a suggested list of beer pairings to accommodate different tastes or to help you out if your local craft beer selection isn’t too vast. Buy The American Craft Beer Cookbook for $13.30.