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  • Is NYC Getting An Urban Gondola?

    The Roosevelt Island Tram, connecting Roosevelt Island to Manhattan’s Upper East Side, is a fun tourist attraction, but it’s not all that useful because how often does anyone need to get to Roosevelt Island? But CityRealty, an online real-estate company, wants to use the Roosevelt Island Tram as a template for the East River Skyway, an urban gondola that will connect Manhattan and Brooklyn. Anyone who has traveled the L train on the NYC subway in recent years can attest to the ever increasing amount of people traveling between Manhattan and Brooklyn’s eastern neighborhoods. As more and more housing developments are erected in Williamsburg and Brooklyn Navy Yard, the L Train riders will continue to swell in numbers. But running subway lines can cost $400 million per mile, a significant amount especially as cities struggle to reign in costs. However, the aerial ropeways that form the backbone of the gondola system cost just $3 to $12 million per mile. CityRealty’s proposal includes three phases. The first phase would see Manhattan connected with Williamsburg in Brooklyn. Phase 2 would go north, through Greenpoint Landing and Long Island City. Phase three would extend south and west, through Brooklyn Navy Yards, DUMBO, and more »

  • 16 Stunning Photos From The Top of One World Trade Center. We Even Zoomed Up On RSVLTS HQ!

    Time Magazine’s Gigapan atop One World Trade center is one of the coolest pieces of technology we’ve ever seen. Check out the video above to show how the camera was actually placed at the top of the building. Using the Gigapan device you can control your view from very top of the Spire, then zoom to explore specific locations in the frame with high-resolution gigapixel images and panoramic photography. Visit http://time.com/world-trade-center to see the story about how the Gigapan ended up atop One World Trade then use it for yourself right here, http://wtc.gigapan.com/wtc. We went through and captured pictures of some notable locations around New York City and New Jersey, including RSVLTS Headquarters.

  • Never Forget: 70 Powerful Images From September 11, 2001

    Some of the following imagery is pretty shocking but we made the decision to include these images in the photo set because it is the sad and shocking part of history. The term “Never Forget” has become semi cliche over the last decade but September 11, 2001 is a date that we must never lose sight of. September 11th was one of those days that everyone who was old enough to experience it will never forget. 9/11 also happened in a time of transitioning media. There was no Youtube, Facebook, Twitter or Instagram. It was one of the last major world events before the rise of citizen journalism. 

  • 1 WTC Is Getting An Equally Tall Residential Neighbor

    Last week Denny’s opened a location in New York’s Financial District and we were positive that there could never be any greater news for the neighborhood. But we were wrong. 125 Greenwich has been announced as downtown’s tallest residential building and second-tallest skyscraper. At 1356 feet, it will be just 12 feet shy of the roof of nearby One World Trade Center and almost as tall as the city’s tallest residential building, Midtown’s 432 Park Avenue. Despite the immense height, 125 Greenwich only features 77 floors due to the enormous ceilings offered. There will be 10 full-floor penthouses at 5300 square feet each, and a 10,600 square foot duplex at the top, which will surely become downtown’s most expensive residence. If you happen to know who buys it, please invite us over. New Jersey must look incredible from there!

  • New York’s East Village Then and Now

    30 years ago, New York’s East Village was like another world. It was the center of the city’s music and art scenes, a place both Madonna and Jean Michel Basquiat called home. But the East Village could also be a dangerous neighborhood, with high crime rates and drug dealers on every corner. Like most of Manhattan, the East Village has since been reborn, with coffee shops, brunch spots, and unaffordable housing. In fact, it’s now one of the most expensive neighborhoods in the city and the country. Photographer Daniel Root recently came across photos he took of the Eat Village in 1984. Realizing its been 30 years and the significant changes in the neighborhood, he has been revisiting the locations and posting the series on Tumblr. There’s no commentary cheering or jeering gentrification, its simply a juxtaposition of then and now, allowing you to make your own conclusions. But there’s no denying that Tomkins could sure use a bandshell again.

  • SoHo Coffee Shop To Open “Central Perk” for ‘Friends’ 20th Anniversary

    Eight O’Clock Coffee will be completely remodeling their SoHo coffee shop into a pop-up shop made in the image of “Central Perk” from Friends. The fully functioning pop-up Central Perk coffee bar will be located at 199 Lafayette Street (at the corner of Broome Street) in Manhattan’s SoHo neighborhood. It will open its doors to the public on Wednesday, September 17, following a special media preview Monday and Tuesday, September 15–16, and will remain open through Saturday, October 18. The shop’s business hours are Mondays–Fridays, 8:00 am–8:00 pm, and Saturdays–Sundays, 10:00 am–8:00 pm. Highlights of the Central Perk pop-up shop include: Select special appearances by Friends’ James Michael Tyler, who guest starred on the series as Central Perk’s infamously deadpan barista, “Gunther” Photo ops on the re-created Central Perk set, including the actual orange couch from the show — perfect for “sofa selfies” Weekly in-store performances akin to Phoebe’s improvised songs; who can forget “Smelly Cat”? Contests and giveaways throughout the month, featuring prizes that include Friends on Blu-ray™ and DVD (all 10 seasons!), the limited-edition Central Perk Roast from Eight O’Clock Coffee, branded gift packs and more! Friends-themed merchandise and Eight O’Clock Coffee’s Central Perk Roast and other bagged varieties available for purchase more »

  • Amazing Slow-Mo Footage Captures A True New York City Summer

    Anyone who’s experienced a New York City summer can tell you it’s anything but pleasant. The heat waves rising from the black pavement, the windows from the skyscrapers above magnifying and directing sunlight straight into your face, that cool refreshing breeze with hints of that garbage smell that seems to be a stagnant cloud around the city. Not pleasant. Not at all. Well filmographer Tim Sessler sought out to change your perception on the beauty of NYC summers by giving you a slowed down version of a city in fast forward. Tessler and his production team at Free Fly Systems traveled around Manhattan, Brooklyn and the Bronx filming everyday life in the big city. Capturing beautiful night time landscapes, skateboarding below the Brooklyn Bridge and playing in the fire hydrant to name a few shots. Shot with the Freefly TERO in the streets of Manhattan, Brooklyn and Queens./Stabilized with the Freefly MōVI M10 and M15./Shot on the Phantom Miro LC320S (1500-2000fps) and Red Epic Dragon STREETS – NEW YORK CITY from Tim Sessler on Vimeo.

  • 5 Things Dante de Blasio Will Love About His New Home and 5 Things He’ll Hate

    In what’s been perhaps the most publicized move since 2008, the de Blasios, on Sunday, said arrivederci to their Park Slope dwelling and ciao to their new, much grander Upper East Side pad, Gracie Mansion. The move is glamorous, but for a teen that’s spent their whole life somewhere, like the mayor’s son Dante, any move can be daunting. In case Dante is still feeling a bit jetlagged and isn’t sure how he feels about the whole ordeal, we’ve broken down five things that Dante will love and five things he’ll hate about the address change.

  • 11 Eerie Photos Of 1960s NYC Devoid Of People

    French photographer Eugene Atget was well known for his photos documenting early 1900s Paris. His antiquated technique, requiring long exposure times, meant Atget would work in the early morning hours, before any pedestrian traffic. The resulting photos show Paris devoid of any people. In 1964, photographer Duane Michaels sought to recreate Atget’s empty city in New York. Michaels wandered the city in the early morning and captured New York like it had never been seen before. For more of Duane Michaels’ work, check out DC Moore Gallery.

  • Take A Look At Coney Island In The 60s [15 Photos]

    Born in New York in the 1940s, photographer Aaron Rose has spent more than 60 years exploring the city and capturing its citizens with his keen eye and had already produced more than 25,000 photos before the art world took notice of him in the 90s. Until a small selection of his work was shown at the Whitney Biennial in 1997, only friends and family were aware of Rose’s talent. A current show at the Museum of the City of New York titled In A World of Their Own: Coney Island Photographs by Aaron Rose, 1961-1963 spotlights 70 photos Rose captured of the city’s most famous beach. For more info on the exhibit, on display through August 3, visit the Museum of the City of New York.

  • 1970s Brooklyn Was Nothing Like The Borough We Know Today [28 Photos]

    From 1972 to 1977, the Environmental Protection Agency sponsored DOCUMERICA, a project set up to “photographically document subjects of environmental concern.” Like the FSA photographers of the New Deal, many of the DOCUMERICA photographers interpreted this to be a broader “document America in all its forms” type of project. And its a good thing they did. World-renowned photographer Danny Lyon was one of the 70 DOCUMERICA photographers. Lyon documented inner-city life in El Paso, Galveston, Houston, Chicago, Brooklyn, and Patterson, New Jersey. His photos capture low-income and ethnic neighborhoods that would end up facing extinction, but not from environmental concerns. It would be in the name of “progress” that this way of life would eventually disappear. Brooklyn is New York City’s fastest-growing borough and its gentrified neighborhoods are drawing more and more young professionals, but it wasn’t always like that. In the 1970s, as neighborhoods continued to shift form Italian and Jewish to black and Puerto-Rican, racial tensions led to rising crime rates and an exodus of almost 500,000 residents, many of them white. Since big developers were wary of the area, Brooklyn became one of the most well-preserved 19th century cities in the country. Lyon recognized the beauty in more »

  • New York Then And Now [18 Photos and Video]

    Amateur photographer Cora Drimus traveled to New York City in April and used the photographs of her trip to make this incredible video juxtaposing the new photos with old shots, some dating back to the 19th century, of the same locations. The result is a reminder of just how much New York City and the world as a whole has changed over the course of the last century. The transition from horse and buggies to cars, railroads to highways, and the rise of ever taller skyscrapers are all documented here. Watch the video and check out some of our favorite photos below.

  • NYC Subways In The 1930s Were Classy [26 Photos]

    Photographer Walker Evans is best known for his portraits of Alabama sharecroppers that he captured for Fortune Magazine in 1936 while on leave from his job as Information Specialist with the Farm Security Administration, but a couple years later he began working on a very different series of portraits. In 1938, Evans began taking photos of everyday commuters in New York City subway cars. To capture his subjects naturally, Evans used a small camera painted flat black that he hung around his neck and hid under his coat. The shutter was rigged to a cable that ran down his sleeve into his hand. For 3 years, Evans used this method, without aid of a flash or viewfinder. The resulting portraits were published in 1966 in a book titled Many Are Called.   Looking through these photos, we are presented with a subway that’s alien to what we have today. Although we’ve come a long way from the filthy, dangerous subways of the 70s and 80s (which you can check out in this gallery!), you’ll never see cars filled with people in hats and furs. Well, maybe on the L into Williamsburg, but that’s a bit different.

  • 50 Best Cities For Single Men in America

    When picking a place to live, the single guy has to take several things into account – what are the job prospects? How much does it cost to live there? Are there any single women? How about the lifestyle? It’s a crucial choice because it determines a lot of what your future is going to look like. Luckily, we’re here to help, as we’ve crunched the numbers, taken all of the above factors, mixed them together and come up with this guide to the 50 best cities for single men in America.

  • 57 Eerie Photos Showing The High Line When It Was An Abandoned Railway

    Before it became a New York City landmark enjoyed by millions of visitors each year The High Line was a condemned freight rail line in dire straights. Built in the 1930s and out of operation since 1980, the track was on the verge of being torn down by the city. Today the park is recognized as the pinnacle of urban redevelopment but let’s take a look at it before the non-profit Friends of the High Line swooped in to save the day. If you want to see what the park looks like today visit The High Line website where they have hundreds of beautiful pictures.

  • 5 New York City Dates That Will Impress Her (Without Breaking Your Wallet!)

    A surefire way to plan a great but reasonably-priced date is to create an experience. This way, the time you spend together will be filled up by an activity or entertainment that lasts for a while and keeps you from buying more cocktails or scrambling for options. The fact that you’re putting in the effort to really plan a date (as opposed to “Oh, let’s just meet at my neighborhood bar”) will be impressive in and of itself. Not to mention, you will have fun if your date feels more like an outing and less like a job interview.

  • Digital Recreations Of NYC Subway Tile Mosaics

    Brooklyn-based freelance art director/designer Adam Chang spent 20 hours last summer riding New York City’s subway and documenting the unique tile mosaics at every station. After 9 subway swipes, Chang had compiled photos of 118 different stations. He then spent countless more hours digitizing each mosaic, thus creating the NY Train Project. Check out the full project on the site for a virtual tour of each subway line along with facts about each station.

  • World Mug: Here are New York’s Best Soccer Bars [Link]

    With the World Cup kicking off June 12, plenty of bars around New York City will be trying to lure you in by pretending like they are really into the sport. But if you want an authentic experience surrounded by true fans of the game, the Village Voice has put together a guide on how to find the best soccer bars around the city. With tips on which fans are in which neighborhoods and how you should choose which team to support, this guide will help you enjoy the games and maybe learn a little something about the sport rather than pounding domestic macrobrews with people who don’t know Ronaldo from Ronaldinho.

  • Pop-Up Restaurant That Parachutes Sandwiches to Customers Is Coming To New York City

    There’s nothing really special about toasted sandwiches, but when they’re delivered via parachute, people are bound to notice. Taking full advantage of this idea is a new Melbourne business called ‘Jafflechutes‘ that has taken the city by storm. More pop-up eatery than regular restaurant, Jafflechutes is just a bunch of guys dropping wrapped sandwiches from their friends’ balconies, to customers down below.

  • New York At Night In 1946 [17 Photos]

    Andreas Feininger was a one of the most popular photographers of the 20th century, known for his black and white scenes of Manhattan. He got his start in 1943 working for “Life” magazine. He would stay with the magazine almost 20 years. Early in his career, in 1946, Feininger published this photo essay, “New York at Night,” in the pages of “Life.” These photos were the only color photos in that issue of the magazine and also some of the only color photos Feininger ever published. He captured the neon lights and life of the city like no one else could. For more info on Feininger and a look at the full issue of “Life” where this came from, check out The Bowery Boys, who unearthed this gem. 

  • The Woolworth Building Became The World’s Tallest Building 101 Years Ago [11 Photos]

    On April 24, 1913, the Woolworth Building opened on Broadway in Lower Manhattan and became the world’s tallest building. At 792 feet, the 60-story building held the title from 1913 to 1930 and is still one of the country’s 50 tallest and one of New York City’s twenty tallest buildings. Its original appearance was akin to that of European Gothic cathedrals, leading to tis nickname “the Cathedral of Commerce.” Much of the original terra-cotta facade was replaced with cast stone and Gothic ornamentation was removed during a restoration in the late 70s, however the ornate lobby has been preserved and is still a major tourist draw. These photos of the construction come from the New York Public Library’s Flickr account. For more information on touring the Woolworth Building, visit Woolworth Tours.

  • RSVLTS Visit The New York World’s Fair 50 Years Later [37 HQ Photos]

    50 years ago today, the New York World’s Fair opened, running for two six-month seasons from 1964-65. Anyone who’s been to a Mets game knows that you can still find reminders of the exposition around Flushing Meadows-Corona Park in Queens, such as the iconic Unisphere. But the highlight of the fair, the New York State Pavilion, has sat unused and off limits to park visitors. Designed by architect Philip Johnson, the New York State Pavilion consists of three sections: the observation towers, the Theaterama, and the “Tent of Tomorrow.” To celebrate the 50 year anniversary, the “Tent of Tomorrow” was opened to visitors just for the day for the first time in years. Thousands showed up, including the RSVLTS, and waited in line for over 4 hours for the chance to see inside. Over the past few years the New York State Pavilion Paint Project has taken over the site and has been working hard at repainting and restoring the Tent of Tomorrow to its former glory. For more info on the project and future plans for the site, visit New York State Pavilion Paint Project.

  • The Sensory Overload Of Times Square Captured In GIF Form [17 GIFs]

    What do you do when you find yourself wandering around Times Square in the early morning hours of Easter Sunday? In the good old days, you could stumble into an adult movie theater, get a box of Jujubes (they last long!), and sit back and enjoy the show. Alas, those days of wine and roses are long gone. Now Times Square is nothing but 24 hours of nonstop advertising, with gigantic video screens promoting Guy Fieri and flashing signs pointing the way to Guy Fieri’s restaurant. With nary a peep show in sight, I had to make my own fun when I found myself in New York’s sense-shattering wonderland at 5 AM. Luckily I was armed with a Samsung Galaxy S5. I had tried taking animated photos before but the results were usually less than stellar, with parts of my subject stationary while other random bits flailed around like a whirling dervish. However, the usually annoying flashing lights of all the signs and video screens made a much better subject. These GIFs have been optimized for the web, but know that the quality of the original files is even more incredible. But due to the S5′s awesome camera, the file more »

  • The 10 Best Rooftop Bars In New York City

    Don’t be fooled by that snow on your windowsill, for the Polar Vortex has been (mostly) vanquished by the Sword of Spring, and you must move all your drinking activities to the great outdoors. Gothamist rounded up a list of excellent rooftop bars last year, and now that warm weather has returned-ish, they’re ready for round two, with some old standbys included along with a few new ones. Here, in no particular order, are their favorite rooftop bars in the city.

  • Adding Color To 15 Iconic and Historic Photos of New York City

    The only thing we love more than Kate Upton floating around in Zero G is when photoshop savvy historians take old black and white photos and bring them to life through creative colorization. One of the most popular stories in RSVLTS.com Adding Color To The Most Iconic Photos In History so we decided to do a follow up focusing on New York City.