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  • How Millennials Are Changing Travel [Link]

    When we were growing up, vacations meant little more than beaches and theme parks, with international travel thought to be a luxury only the wealthy could afford. But that is all changing thanks to millennials. 20% of international tourists, about 200 million people, are between the ages of 16 and 34. These young travelers generate $180 billion a year in tourism revenue, an increase of 30% since 2007. But to what do we owe this drastic change? What makes the millennial generation so driven to travel the world and what does it mean for the future?

  • 1970s Brooklyn Was Nothing Like The Borough We Know Today [28 Photos]

    From 1972 to 1977, the Environmental Protection Agency sponsored DOCUMERICA, a project set up to “photographically document subjects of environmental concern.” Like the FSA photographers of the New Deal, many of the DOCUMERICA photographers interpreted this to be a broader “document America in all its forms” type of project. And its a good thing they did. World-renowned photographer Danny Lyon was one of the 70 DOCUMERICA photographers. Lyon documented inner-city life in El Paso, Galveston, Houston, Chicago, Brooklyn, and Patterson, New Jersey. His photos capture low-income and ethnic neighborhoods that would end up facing extinction, but not from environmental concerns. It would be in the name of “progress” that this way of life would eventually disappear. Brooklyn is New York City’s fastest-growing borough and its gentrified neighborhoods are drawing more and more young professionals, but it wasn’t always like that. In the 1970s, as neighborhoods continued to shift form Italian and Jewish to black and Puerto-Rican, racial tensions led to rising crime rates and an exodus of almost 500,000 residents, many of them white. Since big developers were wary of the area, Brooklyn became one of the most well-preserved 19th century cities in the country. Lyon recognized the beauty in more »

  • New York Then And Now [18 Photos and Video]

    Amateur photographer Cora Drimus traveled to New York City in April and used the photographs of her trip to make this incredible video juxtaposing the new photos with old shots, some dating back to the 19th century, of the same locations. The result is a reminder of just how much New York City and the world as a whole has changed over the course of the last century. The transition from horse and buggies to cars, railroads to highways, and the rise of ever taller skyscrapers are all documented here. Watch the video and check out some of our favorite photos below.

  • NYC Subways In The 1930s Were Classy [26 Photos]

    Photographer Walker Evans is best known for his portraits of Alabama sharecroppers that he captured for Fortune Magazine in 1936 while on leave from his job as Information Specialist with the Farm Security Administration, but a couple years later he began working on a very different series of portraits. In 1938, Evans began taking photos of everyday commuters in New York City subway cars. To capture his subjects naturally, Evans used a small camera painted flat black that he hung around his neck and hid under his coat. The shutter was rigged to a cable that ran down his sleeve into his hand. For 3 years, Evans used this method, without aid of a flash or viewfinder. The resulting portraits were published in 1966 in a book titled Many Are Called.   Looking through these photos, we are presented with a subway that’s alien to what we have today. Although we’ve come a long way from the filthy, dangerous subways of the 70s and 80s (which you can check out in this gallery!), you’ll never see cars filled with people in hats and furs. Well, maybe on the L into Williamsburg, but that’s a bit different.

  • A Visual Guide to Rio De Janeiro [17 HQ Photos]

    With the World Cup kicking off in just a few days, Brazil is getting ready for one of the most anticipated events in their recent history. Though the reception for the games might not be as welcoming as FIFA thought that doesn’t mean tourism won’t be at an all time high for the country and city of Rio De Janeiro. With it’s beautiful beaches and breathtaking landscapes Rio has become the go-to destination for South Americans for years, but is about to really show it’s teeth the the rest of the world in the coming weeks. We’ve compiled a visual guide of locations around Brazil’s biggest city for the out of towner’s and visitors for the upcoming games.

  • A Super Predator Ate a 9-Foot Great White in Australian Waters

    Australian scientists are baffled at what happened to a tagged great white shark in Austrailian Waters. The great white, named “Shark Alpha” was a 9-foot healthy shark tagged in Australian waters. The surprising thing is 4 month after the shark was tagged and tracked the tag washed up onto shore 2.5 miles out from where it was attached. After retrieval, scientists found the tag revealed startling information. The device took a rapid plunge in depth descending 580 meters while making a drastic rise in temperature from 46 degrees F to 78 degrees f, where it stayed a constant for 8 days. The startling fact about that temperature is the only way the tag could’ve reached that temperature height would be if it was in the digestive system of another beast. Though the event might have been a territorial dispute with a much larger shark (16 feet), scientists believe the entire shark was eaten, although a less dramatic conclusion of a chunk bitten out of the shark is also a possibility. A documentary by the Smithsonian Channel reveals how confused scientists are by this strange discovery. Is there a megalodon swimming out there or is this just a PR stunt for more »

  • 50 Best Cities For Single Men in America

    When picking a place to live, the single guy has to take several things into account – what are the job prospects? How much does it cost to live there? Are there any single women? How about the lifestyle? It’s a crucial choice because it determines a lot of what your future is going to look like. Luckily, we’re here to help, as we’ve crunched the numbers, taken all of the above factors, mixed them together and come up with this guide to the 50 best cities for single men in America.

  • A Tribute to Discomfort: Powerful Insights from Nat Geo Photographer Cory Richards

    Cory Richards, renowned National Geographic photographer has traveled the world getting some of the best shots risking it all for the sake of adventure and travel. He’s traveled great lengths to the deepest seas, the highest mountains and some of the most dangerous terrains around the globe, even survived a massive Himalayan avalanche all for the simple pleasure of sharing a photograph with the world. Without any formal photography training, Cory has taken an extraordinary amount of profound photographs in the Nat Geo realm. Richards was adminint about picking up a trade that forced him to get out of his comfort zone and with photography gave him a chance to do just that, while traveling the world on a constant adventure. In a new four-minute documentary, production house, Blue Chalk tells the inspireing story of Cory and his taste for adventure and his inner determination to advance his craft with every photograph. A Tribute to Discomfort: Cory Richards from Blue Chalk on Vimeo.

  • You Can Now Travel by Dragon on Google Maps

    Google is known for hiding Easter eggs in their platforms, like celebrity photobombing in Auto Awesome or countless hidden gems in their search graphic. Now they’re mixing in Maps. If you select a between Snowdon and the Brecon Beacons in Wales, Google will suggest a “dragon” as one of your transport options. They’ve even gone as far as to include an estimated flying time by method of dragon. Where as a drive would take you 3 hr 42 min a ride a top the mythical beast would only take around 21 min. That’s not all, you can call upon the Loch Ness Monster when traveling from Fort Augustus and Urquhart Castle in Scotland which will take around 28 min, much faster than taking the bus, but you might want to leave your cellphone at home.

  • 27 Bizarre Laws and Customs American’s Better Know Before Traveling to These Countries

    Americans—how to say this nicely—tend to offend a lot of people when they’re traveling. Shouts are normal noise levels. Patriotism—’murica—reigns supreme. And sticking to McDonald’s astounds even the greasiest Italian pizzerias. Even as recently as two years ago, Americans ranked themselves as the worst tourists. What kind of masochism is that? One of the biggest American offenses involve ignoring cultural customs and substituting our own—like fanny packs and jorts. To prevent American ignorance, we decided to list a few weird customs and laws from around the world. Break these and you’ll probably be labeled a “silly American,” if you already haven’t been.

  • 57 Eerie Photos Showing The High Line When It Was An Abandoned Railway

    Before it became a New York City landmark enjoyed by millions of visitors each year The High Line was a condemned freight rail line in dire straights. Built in the 1930s and out of operation since 1980, the track was on the verge of being torn down by the city. Today the park is recognized as the pinnacle of urban redevelopment but let’s take a look at it before the non-profit Friends of the High Line swooped in to save the day. If you want to see what the park looks like today visit The High Line website where they have hundreds of beautiful pictures.

  • 5 New York City Dates That Will Impress Her (Without Breaking Your Wallet!)

    A surefire way to plan a great but reasonably-priced date is to create an experience. This way, the time you spend together will be filled up by an activity or entertainment that lasts for a while and keeps you from buying more cocktails or scrambling for options. The fact that you’re putting in the effort to really plan a date (as opposed to “Oh, let’s just meet at my neighborhood bar”) will be impressive in and of itself. Not to mention, you will have fun if your date feels more like an outing and less like a job interview.

  • The Pristine Beaches and Ancient Architecture of Montenegro [15 HQ Photos]

    The Balkans country of Montenegro is a lake side country  on the Adriatic Sea that borders  Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina to the north, Serbia to the northeast, Kosovo to the east, and Albania to the south. After the Yugoslavia civil war in the 1990s, tourism basically flatlined, leaving the beautiful beaches and aging architecture unkempt. As a result a stabilized economic situation and a dramatic increase in tourism, historic hotels and roads are being renovated making Montenegro one of the highest rated tourism spots in the world at this point. It’s Mediterranean climate, having dry summers and mild, rainy winters makes it a great destination for summer fun and ski worthy winters.  All Image credit via: Shutterstock.com

  • China Has A Paris Clone City. And It’s An Eerie Ghost Town. [22 Photos]

    Tianducheng, a gated community near Hangzhou, the capital of China’s Zhejiang province, was constructed in 2007. The city, capable of accommodating more 10,000 residents, was built to simulate Paris, with 12 square miles of Parisian architecture, fountains, and even a 354 foot tall replica of the Eiffel Tower. However, not many mainland China residents can afford the luxurious setting, leaving many of the completed buildings abandoned yet eerily pristine. Only about 2000 people actually live in Tianducheng, most of which are working on the construction of a Paris theme park nearby. The city might not be for everyone, but if you love Paris but hate Parisians (and their high prices) Tianducheng might just be the vacation spot for you.

  • The Top 50 Vacation Hotspots on the Rise

    Yes, New York and Paris will always be two of the most visited cities for travelers in the world, but some lesser known contenders are starting to rise fast. With just about all the information needed for any travel experience at your fingertips adventures to lesser ventured destinations are starting to gain steam. The internet is literally opening up hidden gems of the world to the masses and so countries like Cape Verde, a series of islands off the coast of Africa referred to as “The African Caribbean” which used to be a virtually untouched tourist destination is know a commonly inhabited vacation spot for the more savvy tourist. Africa in general is a rising tourist destination with one unsuspecting country topping the entire list.

  • So It’s Cheaper to Fly From NY to LA for the Stanley Cup Finals Than to Attend a Game at MSG

    When the New York Rangers qualified for the Stanley Cup Finals last Thursday, May 29th, everyone knew tickets at MSG would skyrocket through the roof, but no one thought they would be a nearly unattainable $1,105 for the cheapest seat in the house. The LA Kings are no stranger to the Stanley Cup Finals, achieving Cup victory in 2012 and since having since dominated the league with great goaltending and a plethora of talent.  The Blueshirts are celebrating their 20 year anniversary since the iconic team of Messier, Leetch and Richter brought the cup back to New York for the first time since 1940, so needless to say Rangers fans have been itching for this moment. In 1994 the average ticket price in section 410 was $32 and a section 129 premiere seat was $75. Even after adjusting for inflation over that period of time, the prices convert to just $51.19 and $119.98. The average price for a game 3 ticket at the garden is a staggering $2,202.72, an egregious amount of money to watch an underdog Rangers team  take on a playoff seasoned Los Angeles powerhouse. TiqIQ has projected the tickets for this years Stanley Cup Finals to exceed tickets sold in more »

  • These are the Top Cities For Traveling the Globe

    Trip Advisor recently ranked the best and worst cities in the world based on their accommodations. Using catergories like helpful locals, friendliest taxi drivers and best for nightlife the cities were ranked and reviewed. What better way to rank these categories than to use the worlds largest travel site, which relies heavily on user reviews. The results were compiled based on more than 54,000 responses from those who have recently written TripAdvisor reviews for featured cities around the world. Ranking first for city with the best overall experience was Tokyo. The city also claimed top spots for helpfulness of locals, taxi service, local public transportation, and cleanliness of streets. Tokyo received high marks across the board, as it ranked among the top 10 in 13 of 16 categories in the survey. Other high ranking cities were Singapore, New York City and Barcelona. New York being the only U.S. city on the list.

  • Robin Williams is Selling his $30M Nappa Ranch

    Robin Williams, the eccentric (to say the least) comedian known for his roles in Mrs. Doubtfire, Hook and the voice of Genie in Aladdin is selling his 650-acre Nappa wonderland. The ranch is located in Villa Sorriso is perched atop the Mayacamas Mountans and borders the Sugarloaf Ridge State Park. The entire residence weighs in at 20,000-square-feet, where views of the state park can be seen from nearly anywhere. The house has five bedrooms, plus six full and five half bathrooms, because of all the wine you’ll be drinking I guess, plus a 3,200 square foot guest house in case you need some privacy. The property has 100+ olive trees, which are capable of producing between 30 and 50 gallons of oil per year. That, plus over 18 acres of vineyards producing Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Cabernet Franc. All that plus a wine ranch and limitless ammnities can be all yours for the price of $30M.

  • Charter The World’s Largest Classic Motor Yacht [10 Photos]

    Looking for all the conveniences and luxuries of a modern yacht with the aesthetics of a classic ship? Then NERO is just what you need. The 90 meter superyacht, from China’s Corsair Yachts, has been sailing the seas since 2008 and won the 2009 ShowBoats Award in the category of Best Motor Yacht Over 75 Meters. This summer, NERO and its 20-person crew will be available to charter throughout the Mediterranean around such amazing locales as Sardinia, Corsica, the French and Italian Rivieras and more. And be sure to bring some friends along! NERO can accommodate up to 12 guests in 6 cabins: The Owner’s suite, VIP suite, two double cabins, and two cabins that can be configured with either twin single beds or large double beds. For more info on NERO, check out Blue Water.

  • The Bright Lights Of Vivid Sydney In GIF Form

    From May 23 through June 9, Australia’s most populous city is transformed into “Vivid Sydney,” an interactive light and music show. Now in its sixth year, the festival converts Sydney icons such as the Opera House, Martin Place, and the Museum of Contemporary Art into giant canvasses for showcasing incredible light shows and interactive music performances. These awesome GIFs from The Smithsonian feature just a few of the many spectacles to experience. For more information on the festival, visit Vivid Sydney.

  • You Can Buy Dracula’s Castle for a Mere $80M

      Built in 1226, the The Teutonic Knights a catholic religious order formed in Palestine during the late twelfth century by German crusaders built a fort dubbed Bran in Transylvania. Since then, the fortress has switched hands many times before the man who was the inspiration for Dracula took the castle over.  Vlad the Impaler allied with the people of Bran and Brasov during his first reign after being in charge of taking care of the anti-Ottoman resistance at the border, but during his second reign pillaged the suburbs of Transylvania burning much of it to the ground. After 1918, Transylvania became part of Greater Romania. On December 1st 1920, the citizens of Brasov, through a unanimous decision of the city’s council, led by Mayor Karl Schnell, offered the castle to Queen Maria of Romania, who was described in the deed as “the great queen who (…) spreads her blessing everywhere she walked, thus wining, with an irresistible momentum, the hearts of the entire country’s population”.   The Castle became a favorite residence of Queen Maria, who restored and arranged it to be used as a residence of the royal family. The family has finally put Bran on the market for the small more »

  • Digital Recreations Of NYC Subway Tile Mosaics

    Brooklyn-based freelance art director/designer Adam Chang spent 20 hours last summer riding New York City’s subway and documenting the unique tile mosaics at every station. After 9 subway swipes, Chang had compiled photos of 118 different stations. He then spent countless more hours digitizing each mosaic, thus creating the NY Train Project. Check out the full project on the site for a virtual tour of each subway line along with facts about each station.

  • 26 Insanely Simple Money-Saving Tips to Travel

    People don’t know how to travel. Quit labeling it as “too expensive” or “not feasible” or putting it off for “next year.” Believe it or not, traveling is cheap. Insanely cheap. It’s so cheap that you can live in Bangkok off $10/day. You can eat your way through India off $1 meals. You can even hike ninety days through Scandinavia for $0. But how do you save up for a memorable vacation without selling all of your belongings, sacrificing your quality of life, or convincing strangers to donate to your “travel fund?” It’s hard, but here are twenty-five easy adjustments to budget your finances and prepare you to travel ASAP. Logistics to get out of the way 1. Open travel savings account. Every penny you save belongs in here, and that money’s only to be spent on travel, no Amazon splurge purchases. 2. Set a weekly budget. It could be $100/week or $250/week. I won’t judge, but be diligent and don’t exceed your weekly goals. Cheap Trip Tips 3. Snag a travel rewards card. Seriously, sign-up bonuses alone generally accrue enough points for a free domestic flight. 4. Hack your flights. Is that kosher to say? Flight Hacking in this more »

  • World Mug: Here are New York’s Best Soccer Bars [Link]

    With the World Cup kicking off June 12, plenty of bars around New York City will be trying to lure you in by pretending like they are really into the sport. But if you want an authentic experience surrounded by true fans of the game, the Village Voice has put together a guide on how to find the best soccer bars around the city. With tips on which fans are in which neighborhoods and how you should choose which team to support, this guide will help you enjoy the games and maybe learn a little something about the sport rather than pounding domestic macrobrews with people who don’t know Ronaldo from Ronaldinho.

  • WHAT THE HELL IS TSA PRECHECK AND HOW DO I GET IT? [Link]

    If you’ve traveled recently, you have undoubtedly encountered the snooty bourgeoisie of the traveling classes, being quickly escorted through security because of their TSA PreCheck status. You loathe them, with their noses in the air as you hold your shoes in one hand and belt in the other. But more importantly, you want to be them. So what’s up with PreCheck and how do you get it? Find out here and save time and pride at the airports this summer.

  • Inside Google’s Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Offices

    Google and M Moser Associates have recently completed construction and design on their new Kuala Lumpur headquarters. As of recently the tech mogul’s employees in the area were spread across different offices across Malaysia. “This design – led by M Moser Associates’ Kuala Lumpur team – addresses those needs in spectacularly eclectic fashion. Aesthetically, with its unexpected shifts from beach to forest to city streets, it is a space that begs to be explored and discovered – stimulating and interactive. But beneath the references to Malaysia’s topography and cultural icons is an office shaped around the goal of bringing Google people, customers and ideas together.”

  • 8 Highly Sketchy But Totally Awesome Tours Around the World

    We often travel for the adventure, the thrill of discovery, crafting new experiences unlike anything capable in our own lives—or Facebook whoring our adventures. Some of us like to take our travels to extremes, such extremes we’re willing to sacrifice our lives for the story of it—like the time you jaywalked in Germany. For the adrenaline-junky wanderlusters, here’s a collection of a few of the most dangerous tours around the world. Travel the Death Road Yungas Road, Bolivia claims the lives of 200 to 300 travelers every year. The reason it’s only 200 or 300 is because the bodies of more have yet to be found along the 2,000 foot drop offs. So driving down a road, how hard could that be? Well, it’s a one-way road used as a two-way road. Oh, and did we mention there are no guardrails along the edges. This means nothing prevents cars, bikes, or even a weary-eyed walker from plummeting to their death. And if that’s not enough, mudslides and falling rocks pine to knock trespassers off of Yungas. So why would a road like this exist? It’s only one of a few routes that connects the Amazon rainforest to metropolitan Bolivia. Beware: more »

  • Trippy Star Trails [9 Photos]

    The following collection of start trails were captured by photographer Justin Ng in Singapore from November 2013 to January 2014. The pictures a caused by the earth’s rotation and leaving the camera lens open for an extended period of time.

  • Rome at Night is Bellissima [35 HQ Photos]

    It’s best to explore Rome after hours so here is a RSVLTS approved walking tour along with some incredible nighttime photography of what you’ll see along the way Rome, Italy is one of the most historically significant cities on Earth. For centuries it was the political and historical center of the world and much of the important millennia old architecture can still be seen today. When we visited Rome this past weekend we took a nighttime walking tour of the magnificent city. Below you’ll see a custom Google Map that shows the route and information for each step of the way. The walk is about 3.5 miles, but don’t be intimidated because there are plenty of stops along the way.  Wear comfortable shoes and bring a small tripod so you can recreate some of the stunning long exposure shots you’ll see below. Also, the Trip Advisor app was a great resource for information about each location which we used in the descriptions below. Help a bro out, share this story with your friends: Tweet 1. St. Peter’s Square (Piazza San Pietro) The first piazza you will encounter on the route is also the largest. You nearly have a 360 degree view of the colonnade which is more »

  • Paris Like You’ve Never Seen It Before [Timelapse Video]

    Paris is often called “La Ville-Lumière”or the “The City of Light,” a name it owes first to its fame as a center of education and ideas during the Age of Enlightenment, and later to its early adoption of street lighting. A Russian videographer named Kirill Neiezhmakov produced this incredible timelapse that gives us a tour of Paris like we’ve never seen it before. There are few cities in the world more impressive looking than Paris at night so once you’re done with the video check out Paris at Night [40 High Quality Photos].

  • Pop-Up Restaurant That Parachutes Sandwiches to Customers Is Coming To New York City

    There’s nothing really special about toasted sandwiches, but when they’re delivered via parachute, people are bound to notice. Taking full advantage of this idea is a new Melbourne business called ‘Jafflechutes‘ that has taken the city by storm. More pop-up eatery than regular restaurant, Jafflechutes is just a bunch of guys dropping wrapped sandwiches from their friends’ balconies, to customers down below.