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  • Surprising Photos That Show Everyday Life In Iran Isn’t All That Different From The United States

    Before the critics go ripping us for implying Iran is a place full of rainbows and butterflies we’ll elaborate on the title. Yes, there is rogue violence throughout the country. Yes, women are oppressed. Yes, the U.S. government has travel warnings. But when we came across a Reddit thread featuring suprisingly beautiful photos and a discussion on travel to the country’s biggest city Tehran it became apparent that the U.S. media might be trying to convince us that Iran is a hell hole when in reality it has amazing culture, beautiful people and scenic locations. If you want to read about first hand accounts of travel to Iran check out this fascinating convo on Reddit.

  • Bizarre Clone Cities Around The World [14 Photos]

    Apparently everything has been done as far as architecture is concerned because all over the world cities are ripping off iconic buildings and sometimes, in China’s case, entire cities. Want to see the Parthenon in Greece? Save yourself a few bucks and go see it in Tennessee instead. Their’s ain’t even broken! Want to see the Statue of Liberty but also shop for weird tentacle porn after? Go see the clone in Tokyo! Want to see Paris without all the smug Frenchies? Check out China’s Paris ghost town in Tianducheng! Jeez China, you really make knockoffs of everything, huh?

  • Bird’s Eye View Airport Photos Are Surprisingly Peaceful [12 Photos]

    When you think about airports, you think about the stress of arriving hours before your flight; the stress of getting fondled and interrogated by TSA; the stress of making it to your gate before your flight leaves despite arriving at the airport hours ago. And if you’re afraid of flying, there’s that, too. Airports are not a peaceful place. At least, they aren’t from our point of view, here on the ground. But when you look down at airports from satellite images, they don’t seem so bad. Just expanses of runways and some cute little planes. Even the world’s busiest airports, like Heathrow and JFK, look serene. For more of these calming airport images, check out Holding Pattern. Just don’t let these pictures fool you, airports are still awful.

  • 42 Astounding Natural Wonders of California: No Filter Necessary

    Taking up more than half of the west coast California is home to some of the best beaches and mountains alike. Not to mention endless national parks, endangered wildlife and of course home of the infamous Redwood State Park. California: No Filter Needed. If these astounding photos don’t make you want to drop everything and book a trip to California then nothing will. If you haven’t seen everything on this list get off your butt and start exploring, but make sure you share this with your Facebook friends first.

  • 11 Eerie Photos Of 1960s NYC Devoid Of People

    French photographer Eugene Atget was well known for his photos documenting early 1900s Paris. His antiquated technique, requiring long exposure times, meant Atget would work in the early morning hours, before any pedestrian traffic. The resulting photos show Paris devoid of any people. In 1964, photographer Duane Michaels sought to recreate Atget’s empty city in New York. Michaels wandered the city in the early morning and captured New York like it had never been seen before. For more of Duane Michaels’ work, check out DC Moore Gallery.

  • A Time Lapse Tour Through the Streets of Barcelona

    Barcelona is one of those cities that capture the culture and beauty of it’s people and history through it’s unaltered cobble stone streets and architecture. Shanghai-based photographer Rob Whitworth created a mind boggling time-lapse of the best locations and landscapes the Spanish city has to offer. It took Rob 363 hours work total (75 Hours Logistics and Travel, 31 Hours Scouting and Location Finding, 78 Hours Shooting and 179 Hours Post Production) to create this video. Using a method he calls flow-motion, Rob was able to use 26,014 shots to create this intense virtual tour around Barcelona. Barcelona GO! from Rob Whitworth on Vimeo.

  • Dubai is Creating the World’s First Climate Controlled City/ Bond Villain Headquarters

    Dubai has it’s fair share of surreal accommodations, unheard of luxury and a police squadron of super-cars, so why not? Why not work on plans for a city completely separated from the conditions of the outside world? Why not take 48 million square-feet and turn it into a mini metropolis? It’s called the Mall the of the World, and it will be the world’s first city-sized enclosure allowing it’s residents to nearly avoid outside conditions completely. The point is to give people the ability to experience normal city life inside the controlled environment for weeks on end. With Dubai’s summer temperature averaging 104 degrees (F) the city will be looked at as the premiere destination for travel or even seasonal business. Their winter temperatures reach around 72 degrees (F), during those months the promenade would open it’s roofs allowing cooler temperatures to flow through the city streets. The full monty will include over 100 hotels & serviced apartment buildings, including over 20,000 hotel rooms, the largest theme park in the world and the largest mall in the world, at over 8 million square-feet.

  • 10 of the Toughest Man Meals on the Planet

    According to Hemingway, a man’s diet should consist of ham, sausage, sauerkraut, and beer. In other words, Hemingway thinks men should follow the diet of a German soldier. But what dishes scream manliness like bacon and eggs or simply a pint of scotch, neat. Here, we’re trying to tackle the manliest meals from around the world. We’re not looking for heart-attack burgers or  twenty-three pounds of pork. Instead, we’re giving you hearty, traditional dishes fit for the men at the navy yard. Schweinshaxe, Germany: More specifically, pork knuckle. Juicy and crackly, the Germans serve this platter atop a few pounds of Knödel (potato dumplings), sauerkraut, or red cabbage. Up the Mante: Cleanse your palate with a liter of Augustiner, which is basically another meal in itself.   Black Pudding, United Kingdom: Not pudding in any American sense, black pudding is actually sausage encased with pork blood and oatmeal. Up the Mante: Order with a battered and fried with a traditional English, served with massive slabs of bacon — not like our thin, overly crisp version — fried eggs, more sausage, and, of course, a cup of tea.   Sannakji, South Korea: This South Korean staple turns dinnertime into Fear Factor. more »

  • POV Videos Of Verruckt, The World’s Tallest Waterslide

    Last fall, we shared photos of the construction of Verruckt, the world’s tallest waterslide at Kansas City’s Schlitterbahn water park. Originally slated to open in May, here we are in July and sadly the slide is still not open to the public. However, the folks at Schlitterbahn have given us hope with these two recent videos. The first is a POV video of a test run with only sand bags in the raft while the second video is a manned test run with waterpark designer Jeff Henry and ride engineer John Schooley in the raft. Now let’s just hope they open it up to the public soon!

  • Visit Space In A Luxury Balloon

    Everyone is aware of Virgin Galactic’s space voyages that are set to begin commercial service soon and it would be awesome if we could all go, however not everyone who’s not a celebrity or billionaire adventurer can afford the $250,000 ticket. What many people don’t know is that another company, World View, will be offering tours into space via a luxury balloon for the low, low price of just $75,000. Relatively speaking, that’s not too bad! A joint venture from Arizona’s Paragon Space Development Corporation and British studio Priestmangoode, who designed cabins for Virgin Airlines, World View will take passengers 100,000 feet above the Earth’s surface. The capsule is carried up via large balloon, reaching the 100,000 feet mark in about 90 minutes. The capsule will then float around for a few hours before returning to terra firma. Inside the luxury capsule will be a bar, snack area, and a bathroom and plenty of viewing areas. Reserve your seat with a $5,000 deposit at World View.

  • 14 Hybrid Photos of London’s Bridges Then And Now

    London’s Tower Bridge turns 120 this week and to celebrate the mileston the Museum of London Docklands is hosting its largest art exhibit. Titled Bridge, the exhibit features both historical and contemporary works of art and photography showcasing the city’s many bridges. The museum used photos from their archives and contemporary photos taken from the same angle to create these hybrid photos below. No matter how life has changed over the last century, these bridges are still just as important at connecting the city and its citizens. For more info on the exhibit, running through November 2, check out the Museum of London Docklands.

  • Las Vegas Time-Lapse In 4K Will Blow You Away [Video]

    High-Definition is extremely impressive…if you’re living in the early 2000s. But here in the mid-2010s, 1080p no longer cuts it. The 2160p resolution of 4k ultra high-definition is what we need and we won’t settle for any less. Photo Trekker realizes this and that’s why they made this incredible time-lapse video of Las Vegas that looks more real than looking out the window. It took 5 days of shooting for this 92-second video, using 4 Canon 5D Mark III cameras. There’s two more 4k time-lapse videos on the way from Photo Trekker, and if they’re anything like this, we can’t wait.

  • Find the Cleanest Beach—Near You [Link]

    Summer is here and that means everybody will be squeezing their pale, out of shape winter bodies into their bathing suits and head out to the beach. But while most people were away for the season, some derelicts and ne’er-do-wells were littering your favorite beach with their industrial waste or drug paraphernalia. What are you to do? How about checking out this list of the cleanest beaches across the country? There’s even a map that will show you how clean all your local beaches really are according to the EPA.

  • Take A Look At Coney Island In The 60s [15 Photos]

    Born in New York in the 1940s, photographer Aaron Rose has spent more than 60 years exploring the city and capturing its citizens with his keen eye and had already produced more than 25,000 photos before the art world took notice of him in the 90s. Until a small selection of his work was shown at the Whitney Biennial in 1997, only friends and family were aware of Rose’s talent. A current show at the Museum of the City of New York titled In A World of Their Own: Coney Island Photographs by Aaron Rose, 1961-1963 spotlights 70 photos Rose captured of the city’s most famous beach. For more info on the exhibit, on display through August 3, visit the Museum of the City of New York.

  • Have You Ever Wanted To Kayak In McCovey Cove? It’s Easy! Here’s How…

    Not too long ago we learned that kayaking AT&T Park’s McCovey Cove is a great and inexpensive way to enjoy a ballgame with your friends. Being that the Giants are sitting near the top of the 2014 MLB power rank it’s something you might want to do before the season is over. There are two ways to experience the game from the cove. First, you can rent a kayak from citykayak.com. They are located at Pier 40 only a five minute walk from the stadium. The kayaks are only $35. Keep in mind that you need to kayak from the Pier to the cove which takes about 10-15 minutes. The trip is by no means gruling and you don’t need to be fit like the Winklevoss twins but being in decent shape is a plus. The other way would be to buy a four-person inflatable boat from any camping or sports equipment store. The price to buy, about $120-150, will be just about the same a renting a kayak and you can head into the water from shore of McCovey Cove which is less paddling than if you left from the pier. When you get into the cove get into a more »

  • Visualizing 24 Hours Of International Flights In Under 2 Minutes [Video]

    The UK’s National Air Traffic Services, or NATS, handles 2.2 million flights carrying 220 million passengers in UK airspace each year. NATS services 15 airports in the UK, including Heathrow, the busiest airport in Europe, and also services airports in 30 other countries around the world. This video shows the air traffic they control over a typical 24-hour period in the North Atlantic. Let’s all take a moment to appreciate the hard-working air traffic controllers that deal with this so we can focus on worrying about what movie is shown and if the person sitting next to us is going to be taking off their shoes.

  • Find these Beers Hidden in Paris and the French Countryside

    Two years ago, Smithsonian writer Alastair Bland hid bottles of beer and hard cider throughout southern France and invited readers to find them with just one request: leave a beer in its place for a future scavenger to find. Bland then expanded his “Find the Beer” game to the United States, hiding beers in California and the Pacific Northwest. Recently, he found himself back in southern France and decided to see what beers readers have left behind in his hiding spots. He also decided to hide some more around France.

  • How Millennials Are Changing Travel [Link]

    When we were growing up, vacations meant little more than beaches and theme parks, with international travel thought to be a luxury only the wealthy could afford. But that is all changing thanks to millennials. 20% of international tourists, about 200 million people, are between the ages of 16 and 34. These young travelers generate $180 billion a year in tourism revenue, an increase of 30% since 2007. But to what do we owe this drastic change? What makes the millennial generation so driven to travel the world and what does it mean for the future?

  • 1970s Brooklyn Was Nothing Like The Borough We Know Today [28 Photos]

    From 1972 to 1977, the Environmental Protection Agency sponsored DOCUMERICA, a project set up to “photographically document subjects of environmental concern.” Like the FSA photographers of the New Deal, many of the DOCUMERICA photographers interpreted this to be a broader “document America in all its forms” type of project. And its a good thing they did. World-renowned photographer Danny Lyon was one of the 70 DOCUMERICA photographers. Lyon documented inner-city life in El Paso, Galveston, Houston, Chicago, Brooklyn, and Patterson, New Jersey. His photos capture low-income and ethnic neighborhoods that would end up facing extinction, but not from environmental concerns. It would be in the name of “progress” that this way of life would eventually disappear. Brooklyn is New York City’s fastest-growing borough and its gentrified neighborhoods are drawing more and more young professionals, but it wasn’t always like that. In the 1970s, as neighborhoods continued to shift form Italian and Jewish to black and Puerto-Rican, racial tensions led to rising crime rates and an exodus of almost 500,000 residents, many of them white. Since big developers were wary of the area, Brooklyn became one of the most well-preserved 19th century cities in the country. Lyon recognized the beauty in more »

  • New York Then And Now [18 Photos and Video]

    Amateur photographer Cora Drimus traveled to New York City in April and used the photographs of her trip to make this incredible video juxtaposing the new photos with old shots, some dating back to the 19th century, of the same locations. The result is a reminder of just how much New York City and the world as a whole has changed over the course of the last century. The transition from horse and buggies to cars, railroads to highways, and the rise of ever taller skyscrapers are all documented here. Watch the video and check out some of our favorite photos below.

  • NYC Subways In The 1930s Were Classy [26 Photos]

    Photographer Walker Evans is best known for his portraits of Alabama sharecroppers that he captured for Fortune Magazine in 1936 while on leave from his job as Information Specialist with the Farm Security Administration, but a couple years later he began working on a very different series of portraits. In 1938, Evans began taking photos of everyday commuters in New York City subway cars. To capture his subjects naturally, Evans used a small camera painted flat black that he hung around his neck and hid under his coat. The shutter was rigged to a cable that ran down his sleeve into his hand. For 3 years, Evans used this method, without aid of a flash or viewfinder. The resulting portraits were published in 1966 in a book titled Many Are Called.   Looking through these photos, we are presented with a subway that’s alien to what we have today. Although we’ve come a long way from the filthy, dangerous subways of the 70s and 80s (which you can check out in this gallery!), you’ll never see cars filled with people in hats and furs. Well, maybe on the L into Williamsburg, but that’s a bit different.

  • A Visual Guide to Rio De Janeiro [17 HQ Photos]

    With the World Cup kicking off in just a few days, Brazil is getting ready for one of the most anticipated events in their recent history. Though the reception for the games might not be as welcoming as FIFA thought that doesn’t mean tourism won’t be at an all time high for the country and city of Rio De Janeiro. With it’s beautiful beaches and breathtaking landscapes Rio has become the go-to destination for South Americans for years, but is about to really show it’s teeth the the rest of the world in the coming weeks. We’ve compiled a visual guide of locations around Brazil’s biggest city for the out of towner’s and visitors for the upcoming games.

  • A Super Predator Ate a 9-Foot Great White in Australian Waters

    Australian scientists are baffled at what happened to a tagged great white shark in Austrailian Waters. The great white, named “Shark Alpha” was a 9-foot healthy shark tagged in Australian waters. The surprising thing is 4 month after the shark was tagged and tracked the tag washed up onto shore 2.5 miles out from where it was attached. After retrieval, scientists found the tag revealed startling information. The device took a rapid plunge in depth descending 580 meters while making a drastic rise in temperature from 46 degrees F to 78 degrees f, where it stayed a constant for 8 days. The startling fact about that temperature is the only way the tag could’ve reached that temperature height would be if it was in the digestive system of another beast. Though the event might have been a territorial dispute with a much larger shark (16 feet), scientists believe the entire shark was eaten, although a less dramatic conclusion of a chunk bitten out of the shark is also a possibility. A documentary by the Smithsonian Channel reveals how confused scientists are by this strange discovery. Is there a megalodon swimming out there or is this just a PR stunt for more »

  • 50 Best Cities For Single Men in America

    When picking a place to live, the single guy has to take several things into account – what are the job prospects? How much does it cost to live there? Are there any single women? How about the lifestyle? It’s a crucial choice because it determines a lot of what your future is going to look like. Luckily, we’re here to help, as we’ve crunched the numbers, taken all of the above factors, mixed them together and come up with this guide to the 50 best cities for single men in America.

  • A Tribute to Discomfort: Powerful Insights from Nat Geo Photographer Cory Richards

    Cory Richards, renowned National Geographic photographer has traveled the world getting some of the best shots risking it all for the sake of adventure and travel. He’s traveled great lengths to the deepest seas, the highest mountains and some of the most dangerous terrains around the globe, even survived a massive Himalayan avalanche all for the simple pleasure of sharing a photograph with the world. Without any formal photography training, Cory has taken an extraordinary amount of profound photographs in the Nat Geo realm. Richards was adminint about picking up a trade that forced him to get out of his comfort zone and with photography gave him a chance to do just that, while traveling the world on a constant adventure. In a new four-minute documentary, production house, Blue Chalk tells the inspireing story of Cory and his taste for adventure and his inner determination to advance his craft with every photograph. A Tribute to Discomfort: Cory Richards from Blue Chalk on Vimeo.

  • You Can Now Travel by Dragon on Google Maps

    Google is known for hiding Easter eggs in their platforms, like celebrity photobombing in Auto Awesome or countless hidden gems in their search graphic. Now they’re mixing in Maps. If you select a between Snowdon and the Brecon Beacons in Wales, Google will suggest a “dragon” as one of your transport options. They’ve even gone as far as to include an estimated flying time by method of dragon. Where as a drive would take you 3 hr 42 min a ride a top the mythical beast would only take around 21 min. That’s not all, you can call upon the Loch Ness Monster when traveling from Fort Augustus and Urquhart Castle in Scotland which will take around 28 min, much faster than taking the bus, but you might want to leave your cellphone at home.

  • 27 Bizarre Laws and Customs American’s Better Know Before Traveling to These Countries

    Americans—how to say this nicely—tend to offend a lot of people when they’re traveling. Shouts are normal noise levels. Patriotism—’murica—reigns supreme. And sticking to McDonald’s astounds even the greasiest Italian pizzerias. Even as recently as two years ago, Americans ranked themselves as the worst tourists. What kind of masochism is that? One of the biggest American offenses involve ignoring cultural customs and substituting our own—like fanny packs and jorts. To prevent American ignorance, we decided to list a few weird customs and laws from around the world. Break these and you’ll probably be labeled a “silly American,” if you already haven’t been.

  • 57 Eerie Photos Showing The High Line When It Was An Abandoned Railway

    Before it became a New York City landmark enjoyed by millions of visitors each year The High Line was a condemned freight rail line in dire straights. Built in the 1930s and out of operation since 1980, the track was on the verge of being torn down by the city. Today the park is recognized as the pinnacle of urban redevelopment but let’s take a look at it before the non-profit Friends of the High Line swooped in to save the day. If you want to see what the park looks like today visit The High Line website where they have hundreds of beautiful pictures.

  • 5 New York City Dates That Will Impress Her (Without Breaking Your Wallet!)

    A surefire way to plan a great but reasonably-priced date is to create an experience. This way, the time you spend together will be filled up by an activity or entertainment that lasts for a while and keeps you from buying more cocktails or scrambling for options. The fact that you’re putting in the effort to really plan a date (as opposed to “Oh, let’s just meet at my neighborhood bar”) will be impressive in and of itself. Not to mention, you will have fun if your date feels more like an outing and less like a job interview.

  • The Pristine Beaches and Ancient Architecture of Montenegro [15 HQ Photos]

    The Balkans country of Montenegro is a lake side country  on the Adriatic Sea that borders  Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina to the north, Serbia to the northeast, Kosovo to the east, and Albania to the south. After the Yugoslavia civil war in the 1990s, tourism basically flatlined, leaving the beautiful beaches and aging architecture unkempt. As a result a stabilized economic situation and a dramatic increase in tourism, historic hotels and roads are being renovated making Montenegro one of the highest rated tourism spots in the world at this point. It’s Mediterranean climate, having dry summers and mild, rainy winters makes it a great destination for summer fun and ski worthy winters.  All Image credit via: Shutterstock.com