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  • Inside Google’s Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Offices

    Google and M Moser Associates have recently completed construction and design on their new Kuala Lumpur headquarters. As of recently the tech mogul’s employees in the area were spread across different offices across Malaysia. “This design – led by M Moser Associates’ Kuala Lumpur team – addresses those needs in spectacularly eclectic fashion. Aesthetically, with its unexpected shifts from beach to forest to city streets, it is a space that begs to be explored and discovered – stimulating and interactive. But beneath the references to Malaysia’s topography and cultural icons is an office shaped around the goal of bringing Google people, customers and ideas together.”

  • 8 Highly Sketchy But Totally Awesome Tours Around the World

    We often travel for the adventure, the thrill of discovery, crafting new experiences unlike anything capable in our own lives—or Facebook whoring our adventures. Some of us like to take our travels to extremes, such extremes we’re willing to sacrifice our lives for the story of it—like the time you jaywalked in Germany. For the adrenaline-junky wanderlusters, here’s a collection of a few of the most dangerous tours around the world. Travel the Death Road Yungas Road, Bolivia claims the lives of 200 to 300 travelers every year. The reason it’s only 200 or 300 is because the bodies of more have yet to be found along the 2,000 foot drop offs. So driving down a road, how hard could that be? Well, it’s a one-way road used as a two-way road. Oh, and did we mention there are no guardrails along the edges. This means nothing prevents cars, bikes, or even a weary-eyed walker from plummeting to their death. And if that’s not enough, mudslides and falling rocks pine to knock trespassers off of Yungas. So why would a road like this exist? It’s only one of a few routes that connects the Amazon rainforest to metropolitan Bolivia. Beware: more »

  • Trippy Star Trails [9 Photos]

    The following collection of start trails were captured by photographer Justin Ng in Singapore from November 2013 to January 2014. The pictures a caused by the earth’s rotation and leaving the camera lens open for an extended period of time.

  • Rome at Night is Bellissima [35 HQ Photos]

    It’s best to explore Rome after hours so here is a RSVLTS approved walking tour along with some incredible nighttime photography of what you’ll see along the way Rome, Italy is one of the most historically significant cities on Earth. For centuries it was the political and historical center of the world and much of the important millennia old architecture can still be seen today. When we visited Rome this past weekend we took a nighttime walking tour of the magnificent city. Below you’ll see a custom Google Map that shows the route and information for each step of the way. The walk is about 3.5 miles, but don’t be intimidated because there are plenty of stops along the way.  Wear comfortable shoes and bring a small tripod so you can recreate some of the stunning long exposure shots you’ll see below. Also, the Trip Advisor app was a great resource for information about each location which we used in the descriptions below. Help a bro out, share this story with your friends: Tweet 1. St. Peter’s Square (Piazza San Pietro) The first piazza you will encounter on the route is also the largest. You nearly have a 360 degree view of the colonnade which is more »

  • Paris Like You’ve Never Seen It Before [Timelapse Video]

    Paris is often called “La Ville-Lumière”or the “The City of Light,” a name it owes first to its fame as a center of education and ideas during the Age of Enlightenment, and later to its early adoption of street lighting. A Russian videographer named Kirill Neiezhmakov produced this incredible timelapse that gives us a tour of Paris like we’ve never seen it before. There are few cities in the world more impressive looking than Paris at night so once you’re done with the video check out Paris at Night [40 High Quality Photos].

  • Pop-Up Restaurant That Parachutes Sandwiches to Customers Is Coming To New York City

    There’s nothing really special about toasted sandwiches, but when they’re delivered via parachute, people are bound to notice. Taking full advantage of this idea is a new Melbourne business called ‘Jafflechutes‘ that has taken the city by storm. More pop-up eatery than regular restaurant, Jafflechutes is just a bunch of guys dropping wrapped sandwiches from their friends’ balconies, to customers down below.

  • 3 Year Epic Selfie Wins The Internet [Video]

    Adventure rider, public speaker, professional photographer, videographer and presenter Alex Chacon is on the biggest celebrities in the motorcycle adventure world. He has traveled the world on his bike, most famously on a 500-day solo trip from Alaska to Argentina, and has written about and photographed his travels extensively. This video features GoPro “selfies” from Alex’s journeys in more than 36 countries. For more info on Alex and to keep up with his adventures, check out The Modern Motorcycle Diaries.

  • China is Building a Five-Star Wonderland Hotel in an Abandoned Quarry

    Just outside Shanghai near Tianmenshan Mountain lies an abandon quarry which will be the home to the $555 million Shimao Wonderland InterContinental. A 380-room, five-star, underwater cave hotel that will probably be in a Bond movie in the near future. The partially flooded Chinese quarry will be filled up even more to make the bottom two floors completely submerged.  British design firm Atkins will be in charge of the project hat will be building up 50 feet above the quarry, but drop 19 stories below it. The Wonderland will be home to all sorts of water sports, bungee and cliff diving atop their futuristic waterfall, a sports complex, and yes an aquarium amongst a possible theme park.    

  • 16 Stunning Photos of the Pantheon in Rome

    Almost two thousand years after it was built, the Pantheon’s dome is still the world’s largest unreinforced concrete dome. It is this incredible feat of engineering that makes it the best-preserved of all Ancient Roman buildings. The Pantheon and the incredible square, Piazza della Rotonda, located out front are a must-see for anyone visiting Rome, Italy.

  • The Drag-Racing Horses of Cairo

    On the side streets of Cairo a new breed of working class people of the Shubra district line up along the narrow streets and ally ways setting up wooden carts and plastic chairs for the festivities to begin. Small wagers are set back and fourth and then the fun (and danger begins). In this particular district of Egypt dusk festivities involve drag racing, but not with suped-up japanese imports, in Cairo these men races horses. Renowned photographer David Degner traveled across the globe to get the events on film. As the horse drawn wagons plummet down the avenue, the horses gallop erratically, missing cars, motorcycles, microbuses and even spectators by inches.

  • Incredible Costa Rican Hotel Inside A Boeing 727 [11 HQ Photos]

    The most exclusive suite in all of Costa Rica can be found at the Hotel Costa Verde. A 1967 Boeing 727 has been refurbished and transformed into a two bedroom suite atop a 50-foot pedestal in the rainforest. One bedroom features one queen sized bed while the other features two queen sized beds and both have a private bath and air conditioning. There is also a flat screen TV, kitchenette, dining area, and ocean view terrace. Rates start at just $250 per night. For more info and photos documenting the construction of the hotel, visit Hotel Costa Verde.

  • 10 Coolest International Borders [Infographic]

    International borders can be fascinating for many different reasons. Sometimes there are amazing natural features that divide two countries, such as Iguazu Falls dividing Brazil and Argentina. Other times, the politics of the nations make for an interesting border, such as the ceremony at the India/Pakistan border. Or maybe it’s just the fact that there’s a zipline that makes it cool. You win, Spain and Portugal.

  • 6 Glamorous Foreign Getaways That Don’t Require a U.S. Passport

    Some 195 countries exist in the world, give or take a handful of unacknowledged nations like Puerto Rico, Palestine, or Nevada’s The Republic of Molossia — who’s been at war with East Germany for thirty years, now. Of these 195 countries/city-states/dictatorial-banana-republics, approximately 185 of them require US citizens to carry a passport to visit. So if you don’t own a passport like the other 64% of Americans, you won’t be traveling the world this summer. Of course, the US, the land of the beautiful with those prairies and mountains and foamy oceans, is filled with exotic escapes like sun speckled beaches on Lanai or snorkeling rainbow-hued reefs off Key West, but there’s something more exciting about jetting to a foreign territory, where English may not be spoke, and your restroom just might be a hole in the ground. So if you’re craving that wanderlust, but don’t own a passport, here’s a list of glamorous getaways that don’t require a passport for entry.

  • New York At Night In 1946 [17 Photos]

    Andreas Feininger was a one of the most popular photographers of the 20th century, known for his black and white scenes of Manhattan. He got his start in 1943 working for “Life” magazine. He would stay with the magazine almost 20 years. Early in his career, in 1946, Feininger published this photo essay, “New York at Night,” in the pages of “Life.” These photos were the only color photos in that issue of the magazine and also some of the only color photos Feininger ever published. He captured the neon lights and life of the city like no one else could. For more info on Feininger and a look at the full issue of “Life” where this came from, check out The Bowery Boys, who unearthed this gem. 

  • The Woolworth Building Became The World’s Tallest Building 101 Years Ago [11 Photos]

    On April 24, 1913, the Woolworth Building opened on Broadway in Lower Manhattan and became the world’s tallest building. At 792 feet, the 60-story building held the title from 1913 to 1930 and is still one of the country’s 50 tallest and one of New York City’s twenty tallest buildings. Its original appearance was akin to that of European Gothic cathedrals, leading to tis nickname “the Cathedral of Commerce.” Much of the original terra-cotta facade was replaced with cast stone and Gothic ornamentation was removed during a restoration in the late 70s, however the ornate lobby has been preserved and is still a major tourist draw. These photos of the construction come from the New York Public Library’s Flickr account. For more information on touring the Woolworth Building, visit Woolworth Tours.

  • Travel Through Time With Google Maps

    Have you ever wished you were like Sherman and could travel through time with a WABAC machine? A new feature in Google Maps for desktop allows you to see street views from different moments in time and you don’t even need a smug, talking dog like Mr. Peabody picking on you the whole time. Using images from as far back as 2007, you can now use Google Maps to view the construction of epic edifices, such as New York City’s One World Trade Center, or the destructive forces of nature, such as Christchurch, New Zealand after the 2011 earthquake. You can even use it just to get an idea of seasonal weather when planning a vacation. If nothing else, it’s another way to spend hours looking at Google Maps and dreaming of the world outside your dismal cubicle. You know what a 2007 Street View of your office would like? The exact same, except you would look a tad more fit. Head over to Google Maps for more info then start planning your escape.

  • RSVLTS Visit The New York World’s Fair 50 Years Later [37 HQ Photos]

    50 years ago today, the New York World’s Fair opened, running for two six-month seasons from 1964-65. Anyone who’s been to a Mets game knows that you can still find reminders of the exposition around Flushing Meadows-Corona Park in Queens, such as the iconic Unisphere. But the highlight of the fair, the New York State Pavilion, has sat unused and off limits to park visitors. Designed by architect Philip Johnson, the New York State Pavilion consists of three sections: the observation towers, the Theaterama, and the “Tent of Tomorrow.” To celebrate the 50 year anniversary, the “Tent of Tomorrow” was opened to visitors just for the day for the first time in years. Thousands showed up, including the RSVLTS, and waited in line for over 4 hours for the chance to see inside. Over the past few years the New York State Pavilion Paint Project has taken over the site and has been working hard at repainting and restoring the Tent of Tomorrow to its former glory. For more info on the project and future plans for the site, visit New York State Pavilion Paint Project.

  • The Sensory Overload Of Times Square Captured In GIF Form [17 GIFs]

    What do you do when you find yourself wandering around Times Square in the early morning hours of Easter Sunday? In the good old days, you could stumble into an adult movie theater, get a box of Jujubes (they last long!), and sit back and enjoy the show. Alas, those days of wine and roses are long gone. Now Times Square is nothing but 24 hours of nonstop advertising, with gigantic video screens promoting Guy Fieri and flashing signs pointing the way to Guy Fieri’s restaurant. With nary a peep show in sight, I had to make my own fun when I found myself in New York’s sense-shattering wonderland at 5 AM. Luckily I was armed with a Samsung Galaxy S5. I had tried taking animated photos before but the results were usually less than stellar, with parts of my subject stationary while other random bits flailed around like a whirling dervish. However, the usually annoying flashing lights of all the signs and video screens made a much better subject. These GIFs have been optimized for the web, but know that the quality of the original files is even more incredible. But due to the S5′s awesome camera, the file more »

  • 32 HQ Photos Of Ireland’s Wild Atlantic Way

    The Wild Atlantic Way, the world’s longest coastal driving route, stretches over 1500 miles of Ireland’s west coast. There’s plenty to do along the way, with 159 “Discovery Points” marked along the route. Western Ireland is also home to some of the best whale watching in the world. But more than anything, the best part of the drive is the endless awe-inspiring vistas the country has to offer. For more info and other great photos, check out the Wild Atlantic Way on Facebook.

  • The 10 Best Rooftop Bars In New York City

    Don’t be fooled by that snow on your windowsill, for the Polar Vortex has been (mostly) vanquished by the Sword of Spring, and you must move all your drinking activities to the great outdoors. Gothamist rounded up a list of excellent rooftop bars last year, and now that warm weather has returned-ish, they’re ready for round two, with some old standbys included along with a few new ones. Here, in no particular order, are their favorite rooftop bars in the city.

  • Standardizing The World’s Subway Maps

    Paris-based architect Jug Cerovic was unimpressed with the subway maps he came across while traveling the world. His search for a map that was clear and easy-to-use led him to draw up his own. Beginning with his native Serbia, then moving on to Paris and Madrid, Cerovic created simple maps with lots of information but very little clutter. He continued making maps for subway systems across Europe, Asia, and North America. Along the way, he developed a standardized system that he tried to convince the cities to adopt. However, convincing the various cities to agree on a standard proved impossible, so Cerovic opted just to sell the maps on his website. He is also working on a mobile app so you can always have the maps at your fingertips. I’ve already downloaded the New York map to my phone. It even has the PATH and Light Rail for those of us in New Jersey! Be sure to check out the rest of the maps at INAT.

  • Adding Color To 15 Iconic and Historic Photos of New York City

    The only thing we love more than Kate Upton floating around in Zero G is when photoshop savvy historians take old black and white photos and bring them to life through creative colorization. One of the most popular stories in RSVLTS.com Adding Color To The Most Iconic Photos In History so we decided to do a follow up focusing on New York City. 

  • This Supercut of Rats Invading New York City Will Make Your Skin Crawl [Not For The Squeamish]

    This week, New Yorkers were gripped by an era-defining viral video: the one where a rat runs all over a subway car. But that footage was just part of a larger genre of modern outsider art: cell-phone videos of New York City rats. nymag.com dove into a simple YouTube search (“new york rat”) and uncovered hundreds of videos taken by everyday people who felt the need to document their rat sightings. Some are relatively mundane, at least for native New Yorkers (rats on the subway tracks, rats hanging out near garbage in broad daylight); but some can horrify even the most hardened city-dweller (three words: “rat in toilet”). After rooting through this huge trove of amateur video, they put together a little supercut to celebrate rat videos and the rodents who inspire them. Claw away!

  • How To Get Lost (On Purpose)

    I’ve got a few strange hobbies. I like to ski, I like to drink craft beer, I like to salsa dance, and I like to get lost in new cities. Doesn’t sound too odd, does it? Well, it’s uncomfortable. It’s also frustrating. You always look like a fool when you don’t know where you’re going, and every subway is so tricky to figure out at first. But that’s the point. What a beautiful contrast it is to be the guy staring at rooftops and road signs while the world scurries by. As I write this, I’m sharing a table with a stranger in a random coffee house in Boston. I’m sort of lost. I can see the docks, so I’m not too out of place. I could find myself on a map, if I tried. Either way, after I finish this article and a bit of other work, I’m going to go out and see what else I can find. I heard the aquarium is pretty neat; maybe I’ll stop by. A museum or two? I like history. What I won’t do is this: buy a day pass for a trolley tour with a bunch of other tourists. That’s not more »