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  • New York At Night In 1946 [17 Photos]

    Andreas Feininger was a one of the most popular photographers of the 20th century, known for his black and white scenes of Manhattan. He got his start in 1943 working for “Life” magazine. He would stay with the magazine almost 20 years. Early in his career, in 1946, Feininger published this photo essay, “New York at Night,” in the pages of “Life.” These photos were the only color photos in that issue of the magazine and also some of the only color photos Feininger ever published. He captured the neon lights and life of the city like no one else could. For more info on Feininger and a look at the full issue of “Life” where this came from, check out The Bowery Boys, who unearthed this gem. 

  • The Woolworth Building Became The World’s Tallest Building 101 Years Ago [11 Photos]

    On April 24, 1913, the Woolworth Building opened on Broadway in Lower Manhattan and became the world’s tallest building. At 792 feet, the 60-story building held the title from 1913 to 1930 and is still one of the country’s 50 tallest and one of New York City’s twenty tallest buildings. Its original appearance was akin to that of European Gothic cathedrals, leading to tis nickname “the Cathedral of Commerce.” Much of the original terra-cotta facade was replaced with cast stone and Gothic ornamentation was removed during a restoration in the late 70s, however the ornate lobby has been preserved and is still a major tourist draw. These photos of the construction come from the New York Public Library’s Flickr account. For more information on touring the Woolworth Building, visit Woolworth Tours.

  • Travel Through Time With Google Maps

    Have you ever wished you were like Sherman and could travel through time with a WABAC machine? A new feature in Google Maps for desktop allows you to see street views from different moments in time and you don’t even need a smug, talking dog like Mr. Peabody picking on you the whole time. Using images from as far back as 2007, you can now use Google Maps to view the construction of epic edifices, such as New York City’s One World Trade Center, or the destructive forces of nature, such as Christchurch, New Zealand after the 2011 earthquake. You can even use it just to get an idea of seasonal weather when planning a vacation. If nothing else, it’s another way to spend hours looking at Google Maps and dreaming of the world outside your dismal cubicle. You know what a 2007 Street View of your office would like? The exact same, except you would look a tad more fit. Head over to Google Maps for more info then start planning your escape.

  • RSVLTS Visit The New York World’s Fair 50 Years Later [37 HQ Photos]

    50 years ago today, the New York World’s Fair opened, running for two six-month seasons from 1964-65. Anyone who’s been to a Mets game knows that you can still find reminders of the exposition around Flushing Meadows-Corona Park in Queens, such as the iconic Unisphere. But the highlight of the fair, the New York State Pavilion, has sat unused and off limits to park visitors. Designed by architect Philip Johnson, the New York State Pavilion consists of three sections: the observation towers, the Theaterama, and the “Tent of Tomorrow.” To celebrate the 50 year anniversary, the “Tent of Tomorrow” was opened to visitors just for the day for the first time in years. Thousands showed up, including the RSVLTS, and waited in line for over 4 hours for the chance to see inside. Over the past few years the New York State Pavilion Paint Project has taken over the site and has been working hard at repainting and restoring the Tent of Tomorrow to its former glory. For more info on the project and future plans for the site, visit New York State Pavilion Paint Project.

  • The Sensory Overload Of Times Square Captured In GIF Form [17 GIFs]

    What do you do when you find yourself wandering around Times Square in the early morning hours of Easter Sunday? In the good old days, you could stumble into an adult movie theater, get a box of Jujubes (they last long!), and sit back and enjoy the show. Alas, those days of wine and roses are long gone. Now Times Square is nothing but 24 hours of nonstop advertising, with gigantic video screens promoting Guy Fieri and flashing signs pointing the way to Guy Fieri’s restaurant. With nary a peep show in sight, I had to make my own fun when I found myself in New York’s sense-shattering wonderland at 5 AM. Luckily I was armed with a Samsung Galaxy S5. I had tried taking animated photos before but the results were usually less than stellar, with parts of my subject stationary while other random bits flailed around like a whirling dervish. However, the usually annoying flashing lights of all the signs and video screens made a much better subject. These GIFs have been optimized for the web, but know that the quality of the original files is even more incredible. But due to the S5′s awesome camera, the file more »

  • 32 HQ Photos Of Ireland’s Wild Atlantic Way

    The Wild Atlantic Way, the world’s longest coastal driving route, stretches over 1500 miles of Ireland’s west coast. There’s plenty to do along the way, with 159 “Discovery Points” marked along the route. Western Ireland is also home to some of the best whale watching in the world. But more than anything, the best part of the drive is the endless awe-inspiring vistas the country has to offer. For more info and other great photos, check out the Wild Atlantic Way on Facebook.

  • The 10 Best Rooftop Bars In New York City

    Don’t be fooled by that snow on your windowsill, for the Polar Vortex has been (mostly) vanquished by the Sword of Spring, and you must move all your drinking activities to the great outdoors. Gothamist rounded up a list of excellent rooftop bars last year, and now that warm weather has returned-ish, they’re ready for round two, with some old standbys included along with a few new ones. Here, in no particular order, are their favorite rooftop bars in the city.

  • Standardizing The World’s Subway Maps

    Paris-based architect Jug Cerovic was unimpressed with the subway maps he came across while traveling the world. His search for a map that was clear and easy-to-use led him to draw up his own. Beginning with his native Serbia, then moving on to Paris and Madrid, Cerovic created simple maps with lots of information but very little clutter. He continued making maps for subway systems across Europe, Asia, and North America. Along the way, he developed a standardized system that he tried to convince the cities to adopt. However, convincing the various cities to agree on a standard proved impossible, so Cerovic opted just to sell the maps on his website. He is also working on a mobile app so you can always have the maps at your fingertips. I’ve already downloaded the New York map to my phone. It even has the PATH and Light Rail for those of us in New Jersey! Be sure to check out the rest of the maps at INAT.

  • Adding Color To 15 Iconic and Historic Photos of New York City

    The only thing we love more than Kate Upton floating around in Zero G is when photoshop savvy historians take old black and white photos and bring them to life through creative colorization. One of the most popular stories in RSVLTS.com Adding Color To The Most Iconic Photos In History so we decided to do a follow up focusing on New York City. 

  • This Supercut of Rats Invading New York City Will Make Your Skin Crawl [Not For The Squeamish]

    This week, New Yorkers were gripped by an era-defining viral video: the one where a rat runs all over a subway car. But that footage was just part of a larger genre of modern outsider art: cell-phone videos of New York City rats. nymag.com dove into a simple YouTube search (“new york rat”) and uncovered hundreds of videos taken by everyday people who felt the need to document their rat sightings. Some are relatively mundane, at least for native New Yorkers (rats on the subway tracks, rats hanging out near garbage in broad daylight); but some can horrify even the most hardened city-dweller (three words: “rat in toilet”). After rooting through this huge trove of amateur video, they put together a little supercut to celebrate rat videos and the rodents who inspire them. Claw away!

  • How To Get Lost (On Purpose)

    I’ve got a few strange hobbies. I like to ski, I like to drink craft beer, I like to salsa dance, and I like to get lost in new cities. Doesn’t sound too odd, does it? Well, it’s uncomfortable. It’s also frustrating. You always look like a fool when you don’t know where you’re going, and every subway is so tricky to figure out at first. But that’s the point. What a beautiful contrast it is to be the guy staring at rooftops and road signs while the world scurries by. As I write this, I’m sharing a table with a stranger in a random coffee house in Boston. I’m sort of lost. I can see the docks, so I’m not too out of place. I could find myself on a map, if I tried. Either way, after I finish this article and a bit of other work, I’m going to go out and see what else I can find. I heard the aquarium is pretty neat; maybe I’ll stop by. A museum or two? I like history. What I won’t do is this: buy a day pass for a trolley tour with a bunch of other tourists. That’s not more »

  • American Food Aisles From Around The World [15 Photos]

    Go into pretty much any supermarket in America and you’ll find the “ethnic foods” aisle which undoubtedly stocks all sorts of Mexican food, and, depending on your neighborhood demographics, British, Indian, Korean, Estonian, etc. But if you go to another country will you find “American” food in a special aisle? Hell yeah, you will! And apparently American food to everyone else is either high sodium or high sugar junk food. It’s good to know that wherever you are in the world, you will be able to buy marshmallow fluff and peanut butter. What’s that, garcon? You want me to eat escar-huh? Ain’t that a snail? No thanks, dude, I got me some fluffernutters.

  • New York Public Library Releases 20,000 High-Quality Maps For Free Download

    The New York Public Library has released more than 20,000 high-quality maps for free download through their Map Warper tool. All that’s needed is a free account then download access is granted to all sorts of maps, including 1,100 of the mid-Atlantic states from the 16th to 19th centuries; 700 topographic maps of the Austro-Hungarian empire created between 1877 and 1914; 2,800 maps from state, county and city atlases; 10,300 maps from property, zoning, topographic, and fire insurance atlases of New York City dating from 1852 to 1922; and  more than 1,000 maps of New York City, its boroughs and neighborhoods, dating from 1660 to 1922, which detail transportation, vice, real estate development, urban renewal, industrial development and much more. All they ask is that if used, credit for the maps is given as follows: “From The Lionel Pincus & Princess Firyal Map Division, The New York Public Library.” For more info on the project, check out the NYPL blog.

  • 25 Interesting Borders From Around The World

    As more and more nations face economic hardship, it’s common for immigration policies to face increasing scrutiny. With that in mind, it’s interesting to see how different nations handle their borders. In much of Europe, where travel is open between European Union member states, there is often times little more than a sign, if that. In areas where illegal immigration is a concern, such as the United States-Mexico border, the scene is quite different. But no matter the attitude on the national level, individually we are all just people who want to get along, which is what makes the pictures of the Indian tourists posing with the Chinese border guard and the Arizona-Mexico volleyball match especially poignant. And Slovenia and Croatia just drawing a line through a bar? That’s my kind of diplomacy. For more of these sorts of photos, visit Reddit’s /r/Borderporn.

  • 32 Photos That Will Make You Want To Visit The Great Barrier Reef

    The Great Barrier Reef is the world’s largest coral reef system composed of over 2,900 individual reefs and 900 islands stretching 1,600 miles of the northeastern Australia. Sadly, the ecosystem is incredibly fragile and with climate change, over fishing, oil and additional factors one of the seven wonders is in great jeopardy. We pulled together the following photos to show the stunning beauty of the Great Barrier Reef and encourage you to plan a visit while you can.

  • The 10 Most Dangerously Incredible Roads in the World

    Some of the most beautiful visuals in the world would not exist if it weren’t for the sacrifice man has made out of neccecity to get from point A to point B. A quick route through a mountain created by decades of construction and engineering marvel could lead to some of the most stunning views this world has ever scene. But these roads are just as spectacular as they are dangerous. Mud slides, treacherous terrain and falling cars are some of the challenges you’ll have to endure when traveling to these dangerously incredible roads.

  • The Global Guide To Hand Gestures [Infographic]

    Plan on an international vacation any time soon? You might be wise to look at this infographic and learn what common hand gestures mean around the world. You wouldn’t want to find yourself in a pickle after a giving a thumbs up to some Latin American gentlemen. And the downward hand wave meaning “go away” in some countries and “come here” in others? That’s more confusing than flammable and inflammable! Source: Cheap Flights

  • The Awesome Vehicles of James Bond [13 Photos]

    Beginning today, the London Film Museum will be exhibiting “Bond in Motion,” the largest official collection of James Bond vehicles. And it’s not just the classic cars from the films, all sorts of wacky flying vehicles and submarines are on display, too. For info on tickets, check out the London Film Museum. The exhibit will be running all year long, but if you’re not going to make it, here are some pictures to show you just what you’re missing out on. Is it weird that the Mercury Cougar is probably my favorite of these?

  • Breakdancer at Famous Paris Landmarks [20 Photos]

    Breakdancer Kapstand travels to famous Paris landmarks, photographing himself performing one-arm handstands. His form is so incredible, that if he wasn’t wearing different clothes in the pictures, you’d think it was the same pic Photoshopped into each locale. You can keep up with Kapstand’s upside-down journeys at his Facebook page. It’s all pretty impressive, I guess. I have a picture where I’m doing a somersault in front of Storybook Land in Atlantic City. Kapstand, consider yourself served. 

  • Teen Climbs 1 World Trade Center [Link]

    A 16-year-old from Weehawken, New Jersey has been arrested after climbing to the top of 1 World Trade Center. Around 4 am on Sunday night, Justin Casquejo snuck past a sleeping guard, who has since been fired, and reached the roof of America’s tallest building. The no fun police at the Port Authority are charging Casquejo with misdemeanor trespassing, but it’s more than worth it since he’s now the coolest kid in his high school.

  • Abandoned Salt Mine Becomes An Amusement Park [16 HQ Photos]

    An abandoned salt mine from 1932 has been transformed into a historical site and amusement park in Romania. Salina Turda in Turda, Transylvania, Romania was used as a salt mine beginning in 1075 until it was abandoned in 1932. After 60 years, the site reopened as a historical venue, with much of the old equipment intact, along with an amusement park. Now visitors can learn about salt mines and also go for a ride on a ferris wheel, play some mini golf, basketball, or football, or visit an underground lake. Salina Turda is also well known as a halotherapy spot, with its salt air believed to offer health benefits. It sort of looks like a Mars mine from the original Total Recall. Get your ass to Romania.

  • Florence, Italy is Spectacular at Night [19 High Quality Photos]

    Florence is considered the birthplace of the Renaissance, and has been called the Athens of the Middle Ages. Due to Florence’s artistic and architectural heritage, it has been ranked by Forbes as one of the most beautiful cities in the world, and the city is noted for its history, culture, Renaissance art and architecture and monuments. The city also contains numerous museums and art galleries, such as the Uffizi Gallery and the Pitti Palace, amongst others, and still exerts an influence in the fields of art, culture and politics.

  • Timelapse: The Chicago River Turned Green In 30 Seconds

    Each year on St. Patrick’s Day the Chicago Plumbers Union sponsors an event that turns the Chicago River in the heart of the city bright green. The process usually takes a few hours but now with the help of timelapse we see the entire process sped up to a manageable 30 seconds.

  • NYC’s Mayor De Blasio Gets Entertainment Advice From Steve Buscemi [Video]

    This Saturday marks the annual Inner Circle Show at the New York Hilton where Mayor De Blasio will be lampooned by reporters, bloggers, and radio and TV personalities. Afterwards, the mayor customarily gives his rebuttal to the friendly ribbing. To help out the new mayor with his act, seasoned entertainer Steve Buscemi gives him advice on acting and ventriloquism in this new video. For more information on this year’s 92nd Annual Inner Circle Show, titled “Stuck With de Bill,” and the charities it benefits, check out the official Facebook page.

  • Holi: The Festival Of Colors [24 HQ Photos]

    Holi, the Hindu Festival of Colors, is celebrated all over the world this week. Holi is an annual springtime celebration observed on the last full moon of the lunar month. Bright-colored powders are thrown by participants at friends and strangers alike to celebrate Krishna’s pranks and the arrival of spring and the vibrant colors associated with the season. The following photos are from Holi festivities all across India. If you come across Holi festivities in your neck of the woods, don’t get mad if you get hit with powder. Instead celebrate the moment and enjoy yourself, knowing that spring is here. After this winter, we all deserve a little break.

  • Zooming Out On Famous Landmarks [18 Photos]

    Often when we look at photos of famous landmarks from around the world, our perception of their magnitude and their surroundings is skewed. For some, it could be that we think of them as being enormous edifices, where modern society dare not encroach. While other times we may not grasp just how big they are in relation to their surroundings. By zooming out on a collection of these iconic landmarks, we get a better sense of them, which can be either awe inspiring or soul crushing depending on the circumstances.

  • The World: A Cruise Ship With Permanent Residents [15 Photos]

    Do you want the freedom to travel but also want to take all your stuff with you wherever you go? Are you also incredibly rich? Launched in 2002, The World is a cruise ship whose residents own their apartments on board and many live permanently. There are 150-200 residents from 19 different countries on the ship at any one time, living in 165 residences, from studios to 3-bedroom apartments. They furnish and decorate their rooms however they wish because it is theirs to own. The World will stay at ports around the world for about 3 days, but you don’t really need to leave. The ship has a grocery store, deli, boutique, fitness center, billiard room, golf simulator and putting greens, jogging track, spa, swimming pool, cocktail lounges, and the only full-sized tennis court at sea. The cost? Well, if you have to ask…