Quantcast
  • 15 Eye-Opening HQ Photos Show The Disappearing Aral Sea

    Originally formed where the Syr Darya and Amu Darya rivers joined between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan, the Aral Sea was once one of the four largest lakes in the world. But beginning in the 1960s, Soviet irrigation projects diverted the flow of the rivers and the Aral Sea began its decline. By 2007, the sea was just 10% of its original size and had split into four lakes—the North Aral Sea, the eastern and western basins of the South Aral Sea, and a smaller lake in between the North and South. A dam project was completed in 2005 in an effort to save the North Aral Sea. However, these photos of the last 15 years illustrate how little is left of the once great sea and why the disappearance of the Aral Sea is known as “one of the planet’s worst environmental disasters.”

  • RSVLTS Visit St. Louis For A Bud VIP Weekend [35 HQ Photos]

    Our friends at Budweiser invited us out to St. Louis last weekend for a Bud VIP weekend complete with a brewery tour, Rams game, Cardinals game, and so much more. It sounded great, but we’ll be honest, we had no idea what to expect from the city. We knew it was home to plenty of professional sports teams and the Gateway Arch and…um…yeah, that’s about all we knew. But Budweiser made sure we’d see everything that we were missing out on in one of America’s 20 largest metropolitan areas. Serving as home base for the weekend was the Magnolia Hotel in downtown St. Louis. Known for years as the Mayfair Hotel and hosting such guests as Harry S Truman, Irving Berlin, and Cary Grant, the building had recently undergone renovations and was reopened as the Magnolia Hotel. Budweiser was kind enough to supply us with a keg of Budweiser and plenty of Gooey Louie gooey butter cake. If you’ve never had gooey butter cake, make friends with someone in St. Louis ASAP. Our first big adventure was a VIP tour of the Anheuser-Busch Brewery. Now we’ve taken brewery tours before, but they’ve always been microbreweries. While we love our microbrews, more »

  • 16 HQ Photos From The Early Days Of Mountain Biking

    Retro bikes? Quirky facial hair? Vintage clothing? Overly warm photos with vignetting? Sounds like all the makings of a hipster Instagram account. But these photos are the real deal. They were taken by Wende Cragg, who would get together with her other adventurous cyclists in the 70s and ride down California’s mountain trails during the early days of what would become the sport of mountain biking. At the time, bike manufacturers didn’t build specialized bikes for downhill, mountainous terrain. It was common for ones hub brake to burn up all the grease on these downhill voyages and seize up, requiring one to repack the bearings. Because of this, these races became known as “Repacks” and their popularity led to modern mountain biking as we know it today. More of these great photos can be found at Biking History and for a more in-depth look at Wende Cragg and her fellow California repackers, check out Collectors Weekly.

  • Nairobi At Night Looks Like A Neo-Noir Film Set [20 Photos]

    Nairobi, the capital city of Kenya, is the largest city in Eastern Africa and a major world financial center. As the population grows and the city center becomes more dense, corporations are moving their operations outside the Central Business District. As the infrastructure of the CDB deteriorates, a gritty urban landscape is left in its wake. Just the sort of place that looks great in black and white photographs! Photographer Msingi Sasis realized the beauty of the city’s urban decay, using it as the perfect backdrop for his series Nairobi Noir. The photos capture the heart and humanity that remains in the city as corporations take their business elsewhere. Some of our favorites are below, but you can see the rest of the series at Nairobi Noir.

  • Ralph Lauren Brings Holograms To Fashion Week

    To promote his new brand of Polo for Women, Ralph Lauren hosted a typical Fashion Week party with celebrities (Kendall Jenner) and fancy food (lobster rolls), but he also had something special planned—a 4D hologram spectacular on a 60 foot screen in Central Park. Proving that holograms can be used for more than creepy performances from dead pop stars, Lauren’s models appeared to walk on water during the innovative 10-minute show. Some argue that the clothes, at times appearing blurry, were overshadowed by the technology and extravagance of the show, but ultimately such a display is what will garnish the most media attention for the Polo for Women brand. And by the end of the show, featuring a dancing Ralph Lauren, everyone was enjoying themselves. If you’re a New Yorker who wasn’t invited the party, you and the rest of the hoi polloi can check out a public showing of the holographic performance tonight at 9 in Central Park. And if you’d like to see the clothes in person, head over to the new 38,000 square foot Ralph Lauren Polo flagship store on Fifth Avenue.

  • 16 Photos That Explain Why Customs Can Be So Slow

    Nobody likes waiting in line at the airport and customs can be the worst. We’ve all stood there, waiting for hours wondering what takes so long. Can’t they just let us through faster? Do they ever even find anything? Yes. They find tons. A customs agent on Imgur posted these photos from customs agencies around the world showing all the crazy places people hide drugs, money, and exotic animals. And if this is the stuff they’re able to find, just think of the weird things smugglers do to get their goods in successfully.

  • These Color Photos Of Paris Are 100 Years Old

    Looking at these vivid color photos of Paris, it’s hard to imagine that they were taken over 100 years ago in 1914. They are part of a collection from the Alfred Kahn Museum in Paris. Kahn was a wealthy banker who began funding a project to document the world through photography in 1909. He sent photographers to more than 50 countries around the world. Unfortunately, he had to cancel the project in 1931 when he lost his fortune in the Wall Street Crisis. But by that time, he had amassed 72,000 photos that can now be seen at the museum on the grounds of his Parisian estate. Especially notable among these photos is the original Moulin Rouge which was destroyed by a fire less than a year after the photo was taken.

  • An Icelandic Volcano Is Erupting And It’s Glorious [11 Photos and Video]

    Iceland’s Bardarbunga volcano began erupting on Friday, August 29 with a larger eruption on Sunday, August 31. Fountains of lava have been seen shooting 70 meters into the air. And due to a series of earthquakes since August 16, cracks have been created in the Vatnajokull glacier allowing for lava to pour through. The concern is if the flow continues, the glacier can melt, causing vast flooding in the area. Also, increased volcanic activity has resulted in increasingly violent eruptions over the last 72 hours. The ash warning, initially at red, the highest level, has since been reduced to orange. So far the activity hasn’t affected commercial flights, unlike Eyjafjallajokull volcano in 2010, whose ash cloud interrupted flights for 6 days. It’s incredible to see this amazing display, but it’s also important to remember the very real consequences that can follow.

  • This Tunisian Island Is Becoming A Street Art Paradise [35 Photos]

    Tunisia is probably best known for its desert vistas dotted with stone buildings, characteristics that made it the perfect place to stand in for the planet Tatooine in the Star Wars films. With such beauty, it may seem odd that a Tunisian village is now inviting artists to paint all over their walls. But the result is nothing short of fantastic. The island of Djerba, known as the “Island of Dreams,” is now home to a street art project called “Djerbahood.” 150 artists from 30 countries were invited to Djerba to leave their distinctive marks on the village. During July and August, they visited for a week each and painted their murals. Now one of Tunisia’s oldest cities is home to a marvel of modern art. Check out more photos from the project at Djerbahood and on Facebook.

  • Hospital Food Around The World [17 Photos]

    Have you been in the hospital, suffering from a debilitating injury or horribly diseased, and thought “well, at least it can;t get any worse” only to be fed a meal that makes you envious of the bologna sandwiches at Rikers? Hey, I’ve been there. I once had to eat turkey bacon at an Adventist hospital. Who the hell makes bacon out of a damn turkey?? If you thought other places around the globe had it better, you were right. But don’t be too angry, for it could also be much worse. Bread, a pickle, and an unappetizngly pink sausage? Damn Poland, you scary.

  • When Life Hands You Tomatoes, Throw Them At Each Other [12 Photos]

    Each year, on the last Wednesday of august, the Spanish town of Buñol holds a huge tomato throwing festival known as La Tomatina. It all began in 1945 when a fight during a parade ended with the crowd pelting each other with produce from a vegetable stall. The next year a group brought tomatoes from home and repeated the process. The tradition continued to grow in popularity each year and was actually banned in the 50s, with participants jailed. But the tomato throwers would not give up, and the town eventually conceded. This year 22,000 participants threw 125 tons of ripe tomatoes at each other. Apparently, the town wants ants, because that’s how you get ants.

  • We Can’t Stop Laughing At These Portraits Of People Being Tasered [21 Photos]

    As members of the global family that is the human race, we should feel hurt when watching our brothers and sisters getting shocked with a 300,000 volt stun gun. But we don’t. Instead we laugh. Because it’s funny and it’s not happening to us. Photographer Patrick Hall usually tries to make his models feel as comfortable as possible when he captures their portraits. But that can get boring and probably leads to lots of pent-up anger. Hall found his release in this “Taser Photoshoot,” utilizing the aforementioned 3000,000 volt stun gun. The result is over 50 portraits of people laughing, crying, and sometimes both that make up one of the funniest photoshoots we’ve seen and a nice change from all those sappy “strangers meeting for the first time” shoots that go viral. For more info on the technical aspects of the shoot, you can read Patrick Hall’s write-up at Fstoppers. To view the rest of the series, check out the Taser Photoshoot. Help a bro out, share this story with your friends: Tweet More awesomeness from The Roosevelts 1. Russian Daredevils Climb Dubai’s Princess Tower And Take Stomach-Churning Selfies [13 Photos] 2. 34 Cleaver Photos That Will Make You Double Take more »

  • An Abandoned Shopping Mall Is Now An Urban Aquarium [9 Photos]

    As more of us do all of our shopping online (damn you, Amazon Prime, for making impulse purchases so easy!), our landscape will soon be dotted with thousands of abandoned shopping malls. What will we do with these giant, uncomfortably lit buildings that always smell like Auntie Anne’s, even when there is no actual Auntie Anne’s on the premises? How about a giant aquarium? Would that you drag you out of the house? This mall-turned-aquarium scenario isn’t some work of fiction from the pages of a presumably uninteresting young adult novel. Such a thing actually exists in Thailand! Photographer Jesse Rockwell was living in Bangkok when he heard stories of an abandoned shopping mall. The mall was originally built 11 stories high, but zoning laws didn’t allow buildings taller than 4 stories. The top of the building was demolished only to have the rest of the building burn down in a presumed arson. Rockwell found the mall behind a fence in old town Bangkok. When he went inside, he was greeted with a huge population of koi and catfish swimming throughout the building. The story is that someone began introducing the fish to the mall inthe early 2000s. Since then, their more »

  • 25 Years Ago Mankind Visited Neptune For The First Time [14 Photos]

    With the speed at which technology progresses these days, it’s sometime hard to imagine how far we’ve come in so short a time. Take for instance our knowledge of the planet Neptune. It wasn’t until August of 1989, just 25 years ago, that mankind saw up-close photos of the farthest planet from the sun (since 2006 when those nasty eggheadsof the International Astronomical Union demoted poor Pluto to “dwarf planet” status). Neptune was first seen by telescope in 1846  by Johann Galle using calculations supplied by Urbain Le Verrier. Its largest moon, Triton, was discovered shortly after but it wouldn’t be until the 20th century before the other 13 moons would be seen telescopically. In 1977, NASA launched the Voyager 2 space probe in an effort to explore the outer Solar System and interstellar space. Voyager 2 began exploring Neptune in June, 1989 and on August 25 it made its closest approach to the planet. It then passed close to Triton later that same day. Voyager 2 captured these iconic photos of Neptune and Triton and for the first time we could see the distinguishable weather patterns and Great Dark Spot on the planet. Voyager 2 is still flying through space and more »

  • The Incredible True Story Of A Man Who Carried His Disabled Twin Brother Through An Entire Ironman Race [8 Photos]

    Twin brothers Steen and Peder Madrup were three months early in 1980, weighing only 2.6 pounds. Peder also suffered a lack of oxygen at birth, resulting in cerebral palsy and life confined to a wheelchair. As they grew up Steen became interested in athletic activities while Peder devoted his time to organizations and clubs as a spokesman for the disabled. In 2013, Steen decided he would run a half marathon along with Peder. Peder thought his brother was crazy, but 2 hours and 16 minutes later, they were crossing the finish line. Since then they have completed in increasingly difficult athletic competitions, including Ironman Copenhagen on August 24. After 15 hours and 32 minutes, the brothers crossed the finish line, with Peder becoming the first person with cerebral palsy to complete an Ironman. Take a look at these photos of Steen swimming, cycling, and running with his brother then check out their other races at Team Tvilling.

  • 25 Reasons You Should Follow The Air Force On Instagram

    National Aviation Day was this week so what better way to celebrate than following our own flying servicemen, the US Air Force? All branches of the military have jumped on the social media bandwagon but there is something especially visual about the Air Force that makes their Instagram so great. Is it the expansive aerial vistas? The sleek curves of the SR-71 Blackbird? The otherworldliness of the Stealth Bomber? The badass pilot selfies? Yes. It’s all of those reasons. And more. Check out these highlights and be sure to follow @officialusairforce on Instagram.  

  • Shocking Before & After Photos Of The California Drought

    Until recently, drought conditions had been worsening steadily for California since 2011. The past couple weeks have seen conditions remain the same rather than getting worse, but it doesn’t look like conditions will improve anytime soon, either. A wet El Niño fall had been predicted this year, but as we get closer the chances of such weather actually occurring have dropped to just 65%. And even if it does arrive, it won’t be anywhere near as wet as originally anticipated. With almost 99.8% of the state experiencing “severe” drought and more than half at “exceptional,” the driest on the five-level scale, the situation is looking dire for California residents.

  • You’ll Never Guess How These Tornadoes Of Light Are Created [10 Photos]

    British photographer Martin Kimbell creates incredible tornadoes of light using a most-unlikely object—a hula hoop. Experimenting with different objects to “draw” light designs in his long-exposure photographs, Kimbell eventually settled on the ubiquitous children’s toy and lined it with LEDs. When hurled in the air, the hula hoop is transformed into these dazzling light trails spiraling across the night sky. The trails can be modified by utilizing hoops of varying sizes and weights and altering the throw. Using this method, Kimbell is able to keep all the effects work inside the camera, never having to resort to Photoshop wizardry. See more of Kimbell’s “light paintings” and other series at Flickr.

  • Aerial Shots Of Iceland Or Middle Earth? [13 Photos]

    Iceland, Europe’s most sparsely populated country, is known for it’s incredible natural vistas. With volcanoes, geysers, and waterfalls and bursting with color thanks to an abundance of lichen varieties, it is like nowhere else on Earth. And as magical as it looks from the ground, it’s even more otherworldly when seen from above. France-based photographer Sarah Martinet recently traveled to Iceland and captured these incredible shots from the open windows of an airplane. The landscapes, free of civilization but bursting with natural wonder, look more like Middle Earth from the Lord of the Rings than anything in our world. Check out some of the series below and take a fantasy vacation through the rest of the photos at Sarah Martinet Photography.

  • The Derp-fest That Is Synchronized Swimming [21 Photos]

    When one thinks of synchronized swimming, elaborate technicolor scenes featuring Esther Williams come to mind, with a bevy of beauties effortlessly performing in unison with utmost grace. But no one can be graceful every second, and with our entire lives being captured 24/7 from every angle, even synchronized swimmers get caught looking like schlubs. Recently, the 2014 European Swimming Championship was held in Berlin and the synchronized swimming competition was a goldmine for awkward photos. Take a look below and see what happens when graceful swimmers go full derp.

  • Facekinis Get The High Fashion Treatment; Rey Mysterio Rejoices

    Do you love going to the beach or chillaxing by the pool on a beautiful summer’s day but hate the way the sun transforms your face from a prime cut to aged jerky? Learn the secret that Rey Mysterio and his luchador compadres have known for years and don a facekini. Available in a variety of colors, a facekini is a mask that that covers a swimmer’s face and neck with holes cut out for the eyes, nostrils, and mouth. The bizarre yet useful piece of swimwear first became popular on the beaches of China a couple years ago. But now the facekini has been given the haute couture treatment in Vogue Paris editor Carine Roitfeld’s CR Fashion Book. Check out the fashionable photos below then hurry out and buy your own facekini before all the hipsters get them first.

  • Mt. Stromboli Has Been Flowing Lava Continuously And You Had No Idea [15 Photos]

    Here in the eastern United States we have very little experience with volcanoes, so we tend to believe that a volcano constantly flowing lava would be big news and cause for concern. But in Italy, home to 3 volcanoes that have erupted in the last century, it’s just seen as a boon to tourism. And such is the case with Mt. Stromboli, which we didn’t even know was place, let alone one of the world’s most active volcanoes. For the last 2,000 years, Mt. Stromboli has been pretty much continuously erupting. For the most part, the eruptions are low-level and are actually called Strombolian eruptions, a term used on volcanoes all over the world. However, this year has seen increased activity with some impressive lava flows earlier this year. It looked as if the volcano had calmed down until last week, when the lava once again started to flow. On August 7, the lava traveled 900 feet down the side of the mountain, reaching the sea for the first time since 2007. German volcanologist Dr. Tom Pfeiffer, founder of Volcano Discovery, traveled to Mt. Stromboli August 8-12 and captured these incredible photos of the lava flow. Some of our favorites are below, more »

  • 45 Years Ago The Apollo 11 Astronauts Were Declared Free Of Moon Germs; Ticker-Tape Parade Held

    When you’re the first country to send men to the moon, there are certain precautions you must take. We’re talking, of course, about moon germs. How would you like to be the nation responsible for most epic accomplishment in human history only to have your astronauts return lousy with lunar bacilli that replicates exponentially in the rich Earth atmosphere and eradicates all of humanity? That would be a total bummer and a real bad PR move. NASA knew this and that’s why when the Apollo 11 crew returned to Earth they were placed in a Mobile Quarantine Facility just in case they had some alien disease. The MQF was a converted Airstream trailer that housed the 3 astronauts along with a doctor and assistant for cooking and cleaning. The trailer had a communications facility (read: telephone) which allowed the crew to meet with their families and President Richard Nixon. After almost 3 weeks in quarantine, it was decided that the astronauts were free of moon germs and they were freed on August 10. On August 13, the crew was officially welcomed home with a ticker-tape parade in New York city. Did NASA give up on quarantining their moonmen? Of course! But more »

  • The Bureau Of Land Management Is Killing It On Instagram [50 Photos]

    The United States Bureau of Land Management has one of the biggest and most important jobs in the nation, yet most people don’t even know what they do. Formed in 1946 when the Grazing Service merged with the General Land Office, the BLM is part of the Department of the Interior. It’s the BLM’s mission “To sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of the public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations.” How much public land? 247.3 million acres, mostly in the western states, is under the BLM’s care. That’s an unbelievable 1/8 of the country’s landmass. And there’s another 700 million acres of mineral estate beneath the surface that they also manage. The BLM employs 11,600 permanent and 2,000 seasonal employees and operates with an annual budget slightly above $1 billion. That may seem like a lot of money, but it works out to just $4.59 per surface acre. And when you consider that the lands the BLM tends to generate $6.2 billion in revenue, they are an extremely important agency for economical as well as ecological reasons. To spread the word on what they do, the BLM maintains one of the best Instagram accounts more »

  • These Real-Life Tetris Sculptures Will Calm Your OCD [12 Photos]

    Swedish installation artist Michael Johansson is obsessed with collecting seemingly random objects, grouping them together based on color or shape, and then stacking them. But his stacks aren’t haphazard piles that would come crashing down when faced with a gentle breeze. His stacks are the works of a Tetris master. His works are extremely satisfying to look at, but probably even more so to construct. Fitting that last piece is must be like when you finally get that long, straight tetrimino. And if he ever tires of the art world, he would have a glorious career as a mover. Check out more OCD art from Michael Johansson at his website.

  • Before And After Power Washing Photos Are Oddly Satisfying

    Power washing is a great American past time that doesn’t get the attention it deserves. Power washers can be extremely loud and obnoxious, perfect for pissing off that weenie neighbor who will never work up the nerve to say anything to you about it. Power washers can be dangerous, shooting a stream of water with enough pressure to shoot a toe clean off, although you’ll still do it barefoot because this is America and that’s your right. And best of all, power washers can be operated with one hand, keeping the other free to hold a beer. So take a look at these before and after photos then go out and pressure wash the world. 

  • Get up Close And Personal With Celestial Hardbody Comet 67P [5 HQ Photos]

    Over 10 years ago, in March of 2004, the European Space Agency launched the Rosetta spacecraft. The robotic space probe was built with the intent of studying comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko. On August 6, Rosetta entered into orbit around the comet, the first spacecraft ever to do so. For the next 17 months, Rosetta will orbit 67P while conducting the most detailed study of a comet ever attempted. In November, the Philae robotic lander will land on the surface of 67P for further studies. Below are the first of the comet close-ups received from this incredible mission. Keep up with ESA Mission Rosetta on Twitter.

  • Arab Millionaires Bring Their Supercars On London Vacation [13 Photos]

    Knightsbridge, the upscale residential and retail district in central London, is where wealthy Arab playboys flock each summer during a period known as “The Season.” In a most opulent display, the millionaires bring along their supercars, including Ferraris and Bugattis, parking them wherever they will get the most attention, often ignoring parking laws. Each year “The Season” brings complaints from residents who have to deal with the ostentatious visitors revving and racing their cars all through the night. Also, the London elite are probably jealous of the badass cars that even they can’t afford. At least the show makes for a great photo op!

  • A Crocodile Fought A Shark; You Have A 50/50 Chance Of Guessing What Happened Next [5 Photos]

    A family thought they were just going to snap a few pics of crocodiles in the wild on their croc-sighting trip in Australia’s Top End, but what happened next will go down in history as the single greatest thing that ever happened. Or not. But it’s still pretty cool. A croc known as Brutus, a crowd favorite on the expeditions, went all out with an incredible display wherein he attacked a devoured a bull shark. Photographer Andrew Paice, on a family trip at the time, was lucky enough to capture the rare event. How long before Syfy cashes in with Earthcroc? Or Acrocalypse?

  • Flanders Fields: A Chilling Reminder Of World War I [16 Photos]

    For most of World War I, the front line known as the Western Front straddled the Belgian provinces of West Flanders and East Flanders in an area commonly called Flanders Fields. The name was popularized by a poem entitled “In Flanders Fields,” written by Canadian physician Lieutenant John McCrae who fought in the Second Battle of Ypres in the region in 1915. Today, the area where many infamous battles were fought is home to monuments, cemeteries, and museums dedicated to the fallen soldiers of the Great War. Craters from artillery still dot the landscape and trenches have been preserved as an eerie reminder of the war, which began 100 years ago in 1914 and continued until November, 1918.

  • Russians Go To Hong Kong; Climb All The Things [35 HQ Photos]

    Fun Fact*: Russians have 38 words for “vodka” but no word for “nope.” But what is it with Russians and their complete lack of fear? Is it the vodka coursing through their veins? Or maybe their ushankas are too tight, cutting off circulation to their brains. Whatever the reason, the lack of a fear gene in Russian DNA has enabled them to be a country of daredevils, especially when it comes to climbing tall buildings without any sort of safety precautions. Vitaliy Raskalov and Vadim Makhorov are two such brave (or insane) individuals who recently traveled to Hong Kong and climbed pretty much everything. Some of their most dizzying photos are below, but you can view the rest and other crazy adventures at their site, On The Roofs.  *Not a fact.

  • Put Away Your Pail And Shovel, Your Sand Creations Will Never Look This Good [15 Photos]

    When you think Moscow artist, you probably imagine someone who specializes in bleak paintings or some other medium that is certainly not beach sand. But Moscow does in fact have beaches and the Russian capital is also home to one of the world’s best sand sculptors, Ilya Filimontsev. Ilya took up sand sculpting in 2005 and clearly illustrated an aptitude for it. Before long, he was attending events in North America, Europe, and Asia, taking home plenty of awards along the way. Check out more of Ilya Filimontsev’s incredible work on Facebook and Flickr.

  • Mobile Bachelor Pad Allows For Camping In Style [7 Photos]

    We all like to get away from everything and head into the wilderness for some peace and quiet, but that doesn’t mean we have to go full Ted Kaczynski and while away the hours in a creepy shack, composing technology-fearing manifestos. Why go camping when you can go “glamping?” (Pardon the portmanteau of glamorous and camping, we promise never to use it again.) The Soul Box from Allergutendinge allows you to camp wherever you want without sacrificing the comforts of home. It’s a minimal two-story, mobile structure with a kitchen and bed on the first floor and viewing platform above. The bed doubles as a step to the upper level. The front folds down, becoming a patio, an the top can open up to let in sunlight. Maybe survivalists would have a more pleasant disposition if they opted for such a bright and breezy abode.

  • This Nevada Town Was Destroyed By An Atomic Bomb In 1955 [21 Photos]

    During the 1950s, the US government routinely held atomic bomb tests in Nevada, a number of which were above-ground and could easily be seen in nearby Las Vegas. In May 1955, as the cold war arms race intensified between the US and the Soviet Union, LIFE photographer Loomis Dean traveled to Nevada’s Yucaa Flats to capture the aftermath of an atomic blast test. The series, never published in the magazine, shows the chilling remnants of a town constructed for the sole purpose of being destroyed by the bomb. If only the mannequins were able to duck and cover…

  • Inside The World’s Deepest Cave [15 Photos]

    In Abkhazia, Georgia you can find the spelunking mecca known as Krubera Cave. First discovered in 1960, Krubera Cave is the deepest known cave on Earth. It wasn’t found to be the deepest until 2001, when an expedition of the Ukrainian Speleological Association reached a depth of 5610 feet, besting the previous record, Lamprechtsofen in the Austrian Alps, by over 250 feet. History was made yet again in 2004 when Krubera was found to be more than 2000 meters (6561 feet) deep, the only cave known to be so deep [insert "yo momma" joke here]. For more photos and information on Krubera cave, check out English Russia.

 
unnamed copy