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  • The Volvo Ocean Race Is Insane [18 High Quality Photos]

    The Volvo Ocean Race just may be the most extreme race you’ve never heard of. Held every three years since 1972, the sailing race takes teams all over the world over the course of nine months. The 2014-2015 race is the longest ever, covering 39,379 nautical miles between 11 ports in 11 countries. Just how extreme is it? Aside from being at sea for more than 20 days at a time, the teams, made up of nine sailors, can bring only limited supplies. Food is all freeze-dried and protein bars and must be properly rationed despite sailors burning about 6000 calories each day. Two of the sailors must have medical training to treat any illness or injury that may occur. And temperatures can range from freezing to above 100 degrees Fahrenheit. The second leg of the 2014-2015 Volvo Ocean Race, highlighted in the photos below, just wrapped up after 23 days and 5200 nautical miles, from Cape Town, South Africa to Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Dutch Team Brunel took first place. And what kind of cash can the winners look forward to? Absolutely nothing! Apparently, being badass enough to complete the Volvo Ocean Race is the only reward these more »

  • Paintbrushes Transformed Into Incredible Works Of Art [15 Photos]

    We often take our tools for granted. We marvel at the finish product which would be impossible without the aid of our tools, but we neglect to take the time to marvel at our tools for allowing us to accomplish our work. We can learn a lot from Rebecca Szeto. The San Francisco-based artist recognizes that her paintbrushes are a historical record of the art they’ve helped create. To pay them back for the help, she transforms the brushes into beautifully carved and painted figurines. It almost makes me feel bad for chewing on my brushes until they split then tossing them in the garbage.

  • Junk Food Transformed Into Art In These Renaissance-Style Portraits [10 Photos]

    Are we overly-obsessed with fast food? So much so that the latest quadruple-bacon-greaseburger becomes a coveted object? Or has our sense of irony grown so out of hand that our sarcastic love of something so gross has now become sincere? Or do we just think taking classy photos of Taco Bell is funny? Yeah, probably just the last one. But whatever your reasons, these are some pretty unique photographs. Photographer Rebecca Ruetten’s series of five still life photos and five portraits are an absurd take on the Renaissance work of Caravaggio. Titled “Contemporary Pieces,” the series was exhibited at Karussell Hamburg earlier this year. For more info, check out Rebecca Ruetten.

  • You’ve Got To Be Crazy To Capture New York City Like This [32 High Quality Photos]

    What do they put in the water in Eastern Europe that makes everyone so fearless? Probably Vodka. That’s the only explanation we can think of when it comes to urban explorers such as Ukrainian photographer Vitaliy Raskalov and Russian photographer Vadim Makhorov. Just 21 and 25 years old respectively, the two must not care about seeing their 30s, because they are constantly traveling the world and climbing to the top of every building they come across. Which works out for us because we get these great photos from places we are too practical to ever experience. Recently the duo visited New York City and captured these incredible shots from the tops of skyscrapers and bridges. These are just some of the photos they took, but you can check out the rest, along with more details about the shoot, at On The Roofs.

  • Taking Roller Coaster Pictures To A New Level [47 Photos]

    From the greatest grotesque grimaces to the coolest calm countenances to that dude puking (alliteration isn’t always easy), we’ve collected the best roller coaster action shots out there. What’s that? You’ve got some roller coaster reactions of your own? Well share them with us, we promise not to not laugh at you. 

  • You’ve Never Seen New York City Like This Before [38 High Quality Photos]

    Warning: These may be the greatest photos you’ll ever see of New York City. After viewing, you may be disappointed in every other picture you see of the Big Apple. But it’s totally worth it. Russian photographer Gelio recently visited New York City and quickly realized that to best experience the city, it was necessary to check it out from above. His incredible, high-quality photos capture New York’s fantastic skyscrapers, bridges, and parks from the sky, offering a unique perspective that even natives will never experience. These photos are just a small sample of Gelio’s series. You can check out many more along with descriptions of his journey and the city at Gelio.

  • 62 Photos From The Victoria’s Secret 2014 Fashion Show

    For the first time ever, Victoria’s Secret held their annual fashion show in London rather than New York, which made us feel a little better about not being invited to yesterday’s show. Entertainment was provided by Ariana Grande and Taylor Swift (who fit right in with all the angels). If your invite was also lost in the mail, you can check out all the beautiful women you missed out on in this huge gallery.

  • Paris Then And Now Using Videogame Screenshots [14 Photos]

    Just how real are videogames these days? Well if these screenshots from the latest Assassin’s Creed are any indication, pretty damn real. Each installment in the popular series takes place in a meticulously reconstructed point in history. The latest game takes place in Paris in the late 18th century. To see just how accurate Ubisoft was in recreating the city, Damien Hypolite used screenshots from the game to create “then and now” photos. Amazingly enough, the screenshots fit perfectly with the locations they recreated. What’s even more impressive is that Ubisoft is able to release a new installment of the series in a whole new location each year. We’ve sure come a long way from the New York streets of Ghostbusters on the NES.

  • 15 Photos From Argentina’s Amateur Pole Dance Competition…For Science!

    Although many filthy-minded individuals equate pole dancing with strip clubs, it can actually be an incredible display of acrobatics and athleticism. To prove that point, the Miss Pole Dance South America competition is held each year to find the best the continent has to offer. Now in its seventh year, the competition features women, men, and pairs competitors. The winners move on to the World Pole Dance Championship to be held in Hong Kong in 2015. Check out these photos to gain an appreciation for the awesome strength and skill required to pull off these acrobatics. Plus, they’re pretty hot.

  • Would You Go To A Bar Run Out Of Someone’s Basement? [8 Photos]

    It’s not all that crazy to see a bar operating out of a building’s basement, but usually that building is a commercial property. And there would definitely be something weird about a bar that was run out of the basement of a house. That’s probably why such a bar is a rare sight (legally speaking, at least). In Maryland, there is only one such bar and it has been operating for more than 50 years. Located in Pasadena, Maryland, just south of Baltimore, Irv’s Basement Bar has been operated by 91-year-old Irv Koch since 1963. It was then that he and his brother, both plumbers, bought the property and opened the bar. However, the bar’s exact location is a secret kept by regulars who know to knock on Irv’s front door and ask him to open the bar when they’re in need of libations. So, anyone in the know want to get us in if we travel down to Maryland?

  • Apollo 12 Survived Two Lightning Strikes To Capture These High Quality Lunar Photos

    On November 14, 1969, just four months after Apollo 11 made history and landed on the moon, Apollo 12 took off from Florida’s Kennedy Space Center. Just 36.5 seconds into the flight, lightning struck the Saturn V rocket, causing a false overload that took all three fuel cells offline. A second strike at 52 seconds took out the gyroscopes. The command module was transferred to battery backup, but the Saturn’s guidance system was still functional. Despite the rocky start, the Apollo 12 team reached the lunar surface on November 19. Pete Conrad, Richard Gordon, and Alan Bean became the second team to fly to the moon. When Pete Conrad, a relatively short man at 5’6″, first stepped on the moon he remarked, “Whoopie! Man, that may have been a small one for Neil, but that’s a long one for me.” The following photos are just a few captured by the Apollo 12 astronauts. You can see many others at Project Apollo, but be careful: Once you start looking, it’s impossible to stop.

  • Take A Look Inside This Incredible Himalayan Radio Station [15 Photos]

    Located in Jomsom, a town in Nepal over 9000 feet above sea level, Mustang Broadcasting Community is a community FM radio station used to promote local culture. But constructing a station in a location constantly under attack from strong winds was no simple task. Architect Kim In-cheurl of South Korean firm Archium used locally sourced stone to build thick, protective walls. Interior walls utilize glass to get the most out of natural lighting from above. Doors and chairs made of wood act as a stark contrast to the stone walls and tables used throughout the property. All in all, it’s an incredible work of modern architecture that seamlessly blends into its Himalayan surroundings.

  • Check Out The View From The New Tower Bridge Walkway [12 Photos]

    Visitors to London’s Tower Bridge Experience can now get a spectacular view of the river 138 below from a new glass walkway. The Comprised of six glass weighing over 1100 pounds each, the new addition cost £1 million and is the first major upgrade since the Tower Bridge Experience opened in 1982. And don’t worry, ladies, Tower Bridge staff have assured the public that the glass is thick and the walkway is at an angle offset to the pavement below so as to not pose a threat to those wearing skirts. Or kilts, for the fellas. The west walkway is now open to the public with the east walkway set to open December 1.

  • Rihanna’s Esquire Shoot Is An Early Christmas Present

    We were pretty excited to see Rihanna’s recent return to Instagram, where the sultry singer often pushed the boundaries of the Puritan picture police, but the pop star’s recent photo shoot for Esquire UK is the icing on the cake. We’ve posted some of the photos below, but you can get more info at Esquire and check out Rihanna’s Instagram for some risque bonus pics. And knowing her history with the photo-sharing site, they might not be up for long…

  • The ISS Turns Spooky At Nighttime [15 Photos]

    ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst has been wowing us with incredible photos of the Earth while he looks down from the International Space Station, but now he has turned his lens towards the ISS. Apparently, while orbitting around the Earth 16 times per day, the crew of the ISS require sleep at some point. Since there’s no real “nighttime” for the astronauts, a “lights out” period is necessary to ensure they don’t start eating soap like Ren in “Space Madness.” And while the lights are out, Alexander Gerst floats around snapping pictures of the eerie, dark space station reminiscent of Event Horizon except without all the freaky violence. Hopefully.

  • One World Trade Center Opens For Business And The View Is Amazing

    One World Trade Center’s first tenant will move in on Monday when Conde Nast moves into floors 20 through 44 of the 1,776-foot skyscraper. It has been over 8 years since construction began on the world’s tallest office building, and we can’t wait to see the view from the top for ourselves. Unfortunately, the 120,000 square foot observation deck on the 102nd floor won’t open until spring 2015. However, photographer James Keivom was able to capture these photos from the unfinished deck. For more photos and info about One World Trade Center, check out the full article at the Daily News.

  • 40 Years Ago Muhammad Ali Unveiled The Rope-A-Dope

    The greatest boxing event of the 20th century took place 40 years ago today in Kinshasa, Zaire when undefeated world heavyweight champion George Foreman faced off against former heavyweight champ Muhammad Ali. Ali had been stripped of his title in 1967 when he refused to comply with the draft and enter the US Army. His boxing license was suspended for over 3 years, and when he returned to the sport, Joe Frazier was the undefeated champ. Ali made his way up the ranks and fought Frazier in 1971’s Fight of the Century. Frazier won by decision but two years later faced George Foreman, who knocked Frazier down six times in two rounds before the fight was stopped. Young George Formeman was the new champ. In 1974, promoter Don King was able to convince Ali and Foreman to fight if he could offer up a $5 million purse. The young King didn’t actually have the money, so once the fighters signed on, he searched for an outside country to put up the money and sponsor the fight. President Mobutu Sésé Seko of Zaire was awarded the event and the Rumble in the Jungle was born. The fight itself was memorable for more »

  • The Most Glorious Facial Hair From The 2014 World Beard And Moustache Championships [13 Photos]

    Nearly 300 contestants from 9 countries gathered in Portland, Oregon on Saturday for the 2014 Just for Men World Beard & Moustache Championships. The bewhiskered gents competed in 18 categories for a chance at the grand prize—an all-expense paid trip to the 2015 world championships in Leogang, Austria. Our favorite is the dude who uses his beard to string cheese puffs although the thought of eating them makes us vomit in our mouths a bit. For more info on the competition and upcoming follicle fests, check out Beard Team USA.

  • 45 Photos Celebrating The Life Of Jack Kerouac

    On the night of October 20, 1969, in St. Petersburg, Florida, Jack Kerouac was drinking whiskey while scribbling notes for a novel about his father when he suddenly felt ill. He went to the bathroom where he began to throw up blood. An ambulance was called and he was rushed to the hospital, where emergency surgery was performed, but to no avail. At 5:15 AM on October 21, Kerouac was dead. Just 47 years old, a life of alcohol abuse led to the cirrhosis and internal hemorrhage that claimed his life. Born in Lowell, Massachusetts in 1922, Kerouac was not only a bright child, reading anything he could get his hands on, he was also a gifted athlete. In fact, it was football that brought Kerouac to New York City when he received a scholarship to play the sport at Columbia University. But clashes with famed coach Lout Little and a distaste for the stuffy academic life led Kerouac to drop out of school and join the US Merchant Marine. While at sea, Kerouac wrote his first novel, The Sea is My Brother, which would not be published until 2011. When he returned to New York, he found himself spending more »

  • These New York Photos Are Incredible Composites Of Dozens Of Images

    At the age of 18, Taiwanese artist Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao came to New York to study photography. That was almost 20 years ago, and for the last decade, he has been creating these incredible composite images of iconic New York vistas, made up of dozens of images compressed and layered together. 40 of these amazing composite photos are now on view at the Museum of the City of New York through February 2015. If you can’t make it to the museum, check out six of these images below. Then watch the “making of” video to see how multiple shots are stitched together to create each epic composite.

  • Your Local Mall Can’t Compare With This Turkish Seaside Marvel [14 Photos]

    Yalikavak was one of Turkey’s major sponge fishing ports but has since become known as a tourist destination for its bustling towncenter. Now the town’s marina, a beautiful Mediterranean-style structure composed entirely of travertine, has been converted by Emre Arolat Architects into a shopping destination without compromising the classic construction. Stores, restaurants, and even a hotel will fill the complex. It’ll be the classiest place on Earth to eat one of those Auntie Anne’s hot dog/pretzel hybrids! For more info on the project, checkout the submission at the World Architecture Festival, where the project recently won in the “shopping” category.

  • 10 HQ Photos Of Our Newest National Monument, The San Gabriel Mountains

    Last week, President Obama designated southern California’s San Gabriel Mountains a National Monument. About 350,000 acres of the mountain range’s 655,000 acres received the designation and federal protection that comes along with it. For many residents of Los Angeles, the mountains provide the only open space escape available. In fact, more than 15 million people live within 90 minutes of the mountain range. Also, 30% of Los Angeles’ drinking water comes form the mountains—a very important reason to make sure that water supply is kept clean. Along with the designation comes more than a million dollars to go towards upgrading and maintaining trails and picnic areas. With more than 3 million visitors annually, the San Gabriel Mountains will need all the preservation aid they can get. These high quality photos come from the US Department of Agriculture. For more great photos, check out the USDA on Flickr.

  • This German Astronaut Is Capturing Incredible Photos Of The Earth [40 Photos]

    Dr. Alexander Gerst is a German geophysicist and was selected to be an astronaut by the European Space Agency in 2009. Ealirer this year, he launched from Kazakhstan to join the crew at the International Space Station. Currently a member of Expedition 41, Gerst has been capturing incredible photos of the Earth and, thanks to the miracle of social media, has been able to immediately share his work. Some of our favorites are in the gallery, but you can keep up with “Astro Alex” on Twitter and Flickr.

  • Kurt Cobain’s Final Photo Shoot Revealed

    In August 1993, Nirvana was in New York for a performance at the Roseland Ballroom. Photographer Jesse Frohman was sent to shoot the band for the London Observer’s Sunday magazine. Nobody knew at the time that it would be the last formal photo shoot before Kurt Cobain committed suicide in April, 1994. Now the 90 photos have been collected in a new book entitled Kurt Cobain: The Last Session. Along with the photographs, the interview between Cobain and music journalist Jon Savage that originally appeared in the Observer has been reprinted. Check out the photos below and read an excerpt from the interview at Dazed Digital. And you can pre-order the book, to be published November 12, from Amazon for $31.

  • The Old-School Beauty Of Anita Ekberg

    Born in 1931, Swedish actress and pin-up model Anita Ekberg is best known for her role in Fellini’s “La Dolce Vita.” In the iconic film, which introduced the world to the word “paparazzi” via the annoying photographer Paparazzo, Ekberg wades through Rome’s Trevi Fountain in a sensual scene. Ekberg’s career began in the 50s, after being crowned Miss Sweden in 1950. She then moved to the United States to take part in the Miss Universe competition. Although she did not win, she garnered enough attention to begin modeling in pin-up magazines. By the mid-1950s, Ekberg had entered the film industry and was even advertised as “Paramount’s Marilyn Monroe.” It was “La Dolce Vita” in 1960 that made Ekberg a legend and solidified her status as a sex symbol. And Rome must have made quite an impact on her, for it is where resides today, at the age of 83.

  • 14 HQ Photos From The World’s Largest Hot Air Balloon Festival

    The world’s largest hot air balloon event, the Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta, is currently underway in New Mexico. The nine-day event, which ends October 12, is currently is in its 43rd year. Over 500 teams from 22 countries have brought their balloons to this year’s festivities, a huge difference from the original gathering in 1972 which saw just 13 balloons take to the skies. In addition to various competitions including races, a ring toss, and pole grab events, the get-together is also an opportunity for creative aeronauts to showcase their uniquely shaped and decorated balloons. For more info on this year’s festival check out Balloon Fiesta.

  • Thor Heyerdahl Was An Awesome Adventurer [30 Photos]

    Today marks the 100th birthday of Norwegian adventurer Thor Heyerdahl. While studying zoology and botany as a young man in Oslo, Heyerdahl spent his free time pouring over books about Polynesian history and culture. Although common beliefs hold that Polynesia was settled from west to east, Heyerdahl believed that South Americans, particularly Incas, were able to make the voyage west across the Pacific Ocean. To prove his hypothesis, Heyerdahl constructed an Incan raft based on writings and drawings from the Spanish conquistadors. The primitive boat, named the Kon-Tiki, successfully completed the 101-day journey from Peru to French Polynesia in 1947. The boat and film documenting the trip were immediate hits worldwide and Thor Heyerdahl became the world’s most notable adventurer. Over the following decades, Heyerdahl completed other voyages in primitive boats, but the Kon-Tiki remained his most famous expedition. Heyerdahl passed away in 2002 at the age of 87, but interest in his life and explorations continue. “Kon-Tiki,” a historical drama about the voyage, was released in 2012 to critical acclaim and was nominated for an Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film.

  • 15 Eye-Opening HQ Photos Show The Disappearing Aral Sea

    Originally formed where the Syr Darya and Amu Darya rivers joined between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan, the Aral Sea was once one of the four largest lakes in the world. But beginning in the 1960s, Soviet irrigation projects diverted the flow of the rivers and the Aral Sea began its decline. By 2007, the sea was just 10% of its original size and had split into four lakes—the North Aral Sea, the eastern and western basins of the South Aral Sea, and a smaller lake in between the North and South. A dam project was completed in 2005 in an effort to save the North Aral Sea. However, these photos of the last 15 years illustrate how little is left of the once great sea and why the disappearance of the Aral Sea is known as “one of the planet’s worst environmental disasters.”

  • RSVLTS Visit St. Louis For A Bud VIP Weekend [35 HQ Photos]

    Our friends at Budweiser invited us out to St. Louis last weekend for a Bud VIP weekend complete with a brewery tour, Rams game, Cardinals game, and so much more. It sounded great, but we’ll be honest, we had no idea what to expect from the city. We knew it was home to plenty of professional sports teams and the Gateway Arch and…um…yeah, that’s about all we knew. But Budweiser made sure we’d see everything that we were missing out on in one of America’s 20 largest metropolitan areas. Serving as home base for the weekend was the Magnolia Hotel in downtown St. Louis. Known for years as the Mayfair Hotel and hosting such guests as Harry S Truman, Irving Berlin, and Cary Grant, the building had recently undergone renovations and was reopened as the Magnolia Hotel. Budweiser was kind enough to supply us with a keg of Budweiser and plenty of Gooey Louie gooey butter cake. If you’ve never had gooey butter cake, make friends with someone in St. Louis ASAP. Our first big adventure was a VIP tour of the Anheuser-Busch Brewery. Now we’ve taken brewery tours before, but they’ve always been microbreweries. While we love our microbrews, more »

  • 16 HQ Photos From The Early Days Of Mountain Biking

    Retro bikes? Quirky facial hair? Vintage clothing? Overly warm photos with vignetting? Sounds like all the makings of a hipster Instagram account. But these photos are the real deal. They were taken by Wende Cragg, who would get together with her other adventurous cyclists in the 70s and ride down California’s mountain trails during the early days of what would become the sport of mountain biking. At the time, bike manufacturers didn’t build specialized bikes for downhill, mountainous terrain. It was common for ones hub brake to burn up all the grease on these downhill voyages and seize up, requiring one to repack the bearings. Because of this, these races became known as “Repacks” and their popularity led to modern mountain biking as we know it today. More of these great photos can be found at Biking History and for a more in-depth look at Wende Cragg and her fellow California repackers, check out Collectors Weekly.

  • Nairobi At Night Looks Like A Neo-Noir Film Set [20 Photos]

    Nairobi, the capital city of Kenya, is the largest city in Eastern Africa and a major world financial center. As the population grows and the city center becomes more dense, corporations are moving their operations outside the Central Business District. As the infrastructure of the CDB deteriorates, a gritty urban landscape is left in its wake. Just the sort of place that looks great in black and white photographs! Photographer Msingi Sasis realized the beauty of the city’s urban decay, using it as the perfect backdrop for his series Nairobi Noir. The photos capture the heart and humanity that remains in the city as corporations take their business elsewhere. Some of our favorites are below, but you can see the rest of the series at Nairobi Noir.

  • Ralph Lauren Brings Holograms To Fashion Week

    To promote his new brand of Polo for Women, Ralph Lauren hosted a typical Fashion Week party with celebrities (Kendall Jenner) and fancy food (lobster rolls), but he also had something special planned—a 4D hologram spectacular on a 60 foot screen in Central Park. Proving that holograms can be used for more than creepy performances from dead pop stars, Lauren’s models appeared to walk on water during the innovative 10-minute show. Some argue that the clothes, at times appearing blurry, were overshadowed by the technology and extravagance of the show, but ultimately such a display is what will garnish the most media attention for the Polo for Women brand. And by the end of the show, featuring a dancing Ralph Lauren, everyone was enjoying themselves. If you’re a New Yorker who wasn’t invited the party, you and the rest of the hoi polloi can check out a public showing of the holographic performance tonight at 9 in Central Park. And if you’d like to see the clothes in person, head over to the new 38,000 square foot Ralph Lauren Polo flagship store on Fifth Avenue.

  • 16 Photos That Explain Why Customs Can Be So Slow

    Nobody likes waiting in line at the airport and customs can be the worst. We’ve all stood there, waiting for hours wondering what takes so long. Can’t they just let us through faster? Do they ever even find anything? Yes. They find tons. A customs agent on Imgur posted these photos from customs agencies around the world showing all the crazy places people hide drugs, money, and exotic animals. And if this is the stuff they’re able to find, just think of the weird things smugglers do to get their goods in successfully.

  • These Color Photos Of Paris Are 100 Years Old

    Looking at these vivid color photos of Paris, it’s hard to imagine that they were taken over 100 years ago in 1914. They are part of a collection from the Alfred Kahn Museum in Paris. Kahn was a wealthy banker who began funding a project to document the world through photography in 1909. He sent photographers to more than 50 countries around the world. Unfortunately, he had to cancel the project in 1931 when he lost his fortune in the Wall Street Crisis. But by that time, he had amassed 72,000 photos that can now be seen at the museum on the grounds of his Parisian estate. Especially notable among these photos is the original Moulin Rouge which was destroyed by a fire less than a year after the photo was taken.

  • An Icelandic Volcano Is Erupting And It’s Glorious [11 Photos and Video]

    Iceland’s Bardarbunga volcano began erupting on Friday, August 29 with a larger eruption on Sunday, August 31. Fountains of lava have been seen shooting 70 meters into the air. And due to a series of earthquakes since August 16, cracks have been created in the Vatnajokull glacier allowing for lava to pour through. The concern is if the flow continues, the glacier can melt, causing vast flooding in the area. Also, increased volcanic activity has resulted in increasingly violent eruptions over the last 72 hours. The ash warning, initially at red, the highest level, has since been reduced to orange. So far the activity hasn’t affected commercial flights, unlike Eyjafjallajokull volcano in 2010, whose ash cloud interrupted flights for 6 days. It’s incredible to see this amazing display, but it’s also important to remember the very real consequences that can follow.

 
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