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  • This Insider’s Look At The Giant Panda Research Center Is As Awesome As It Sounds [13 Photos]

    Photographer Ami Vitale was recently given exclusive access into the Woolong National Nature Reserve managed by the China Conservation and Research Center for the Giant Panda. Pandas are trained there to exist in the wild so they will survive after being released. The training involves keepers dressed in panda suits (complete with authentic panda smell) mimicking conditions in the wild. Only about 1600 pandas currently exist in the wild, but researchers hope that with the help of the training center, those numbers will steadily rise. For more of Ami Vitale’s work, check out Ami Vitale Photography.

  • What If Famous Designers Packaged Food? [10 Photos]

    Designer Peddy Mergui wants people to notice how much power a product’s package has over buyers. To illustrate the point, he wrapped over a dozen basic products, such as milk, flour, and oranges, in famous brands’ packaging for his series “Wheat is Wheat is Wheat.” Once these boring, everyday staples are wrapped in designer packaging, we suddenly want to purchase them and are willing to pay a premium for the lifestyle the brand symbolizes. For more info on the exhibit, visit the San Francisco Museum of Craft and Design. Personally, I think the Dolce & Gabbana butter cookie looks delicious but I’m pretty sure I couldn’t afford it. But I would totally make fun of whoever would buy iMilk. Android Milk for life!

  • These Sculptures Of Shrouded Ghosts Will Give You Chills

    In his “Ghosts Underground” series, Italian sculptor Livio Scapella depicts the expressions of shrouded souls coming to terms with their fate. If the busts look familiar, it’s because they are a modern twist on the 18th century works of Italian masters Antonio Corradini and Giuseppe Sanmartino, whose sculptures of veiled figures have haunted the world for 400 years. The stones dark and light stones embedded in the chests, symbolizing a hardened heart, are strictly a Scapella flourish, though. As unnerving as the subject of death can be, there is no denying the beauty and skill involved in these sculptures. Scapella is a more than capable successor to the Italian masters who came before him.

  • Amazing Photos Recreate Pan Am flight Experience Down To Every Detail [14 Photos]

    Michael Kelley is a photographer who also happens to be an aviation geek. Anthony Toth is the pinnacle of aviation geeks, whose love of Pan Am led him to construct a replica of the interior of a 747 inside a 3000-square-foot warehouse. When these two men got together, this incredible photography project happened. With Kelley’s photography skills and Toth’s detailed set (even the silverware is authentic Pan Am), these photos really look like they were taken in the 70s. After looking through the pictures, be sure to read Kelley’s extremely interesting article at Fstoppers detailing how the project came about along with all the technical aspects. There’s also a great behind-the-scenes video to watch.

  • Audi TT Offroad Concept Gets 124 MPG [7 Photos]

    At the Shanghai Auto Show, Audi showed off its newest concept vehicle just to toy with us. The TT Offroad is a compact SUV with a hybrid drivetrain. Its 12 kilowatt-hour lithium-ion battery has an all-electric range of 31 miles, but its inductive charging system allows it to be charged by parking on an inductive mat—no wire necessary. The TT Offroad can reach 60 miles an hour in 5.2 seconds and in the all-electric EV mode, can reach about 80 mph. The two motors mean that in Hybrid mode, the front motor is often used to charge the battery, much like the Chevy Volt. Best of all, the concept features a 1:8 scale radio controlled version stashed in the trunk. Unfortunately, the TT Offroad is just a concept car and Audi estimates at least 2 years until a similar production car exists. That is, if they even decide to go in that direction.

  • RSVLTS Visit The New York World’s Fair 50 Years Later [37 HQ Photos]

    50 years ago today, the New York World’s Fair opened, running for two six-month seasons from 1964-65. Anyone who’s been to a Mets game knows that you can still find reminders of the exposition around Flushing Meadows-Corona Park in Queens, such as the iconic Unisphere. But the highlight of the fair, the New York State Pavilion, has sat unused and off limits to park visitors. Designed by architect Philip Johnson, the New York State Pavilion consists of three sections: the observation towers, the Theaterama, and the “Tent of Tomorrow.” To celebrate the 50 year anniversary, the “Tent of Tomorrow” was opened to visitors just for the day for the first time in years. Thousands showed up, including the RSVLTS, and waited in line for over 4 hours for the chance to see inside. Over the past few years the New York State Pavilion Paint Project has taken over the site and has been working hard at repainting and restoring the Tent of Tomorrow to its former glory. For more info on the project and future plans for the site, visit New York State Pavilion Paint Project.

  • Them Eyes: 15 Photos Of Powerful Peepers

    Photojournalist Steve McCurry is best known for his photo “Afghan Girl,” which appeared on the cover of National Geographic in June, 1985. The photo is known for the girl’s powerful glare directly at the camera. Today McCurry has a blog where he groups his iconic photographs into categories. “Eloquence of the Eye” is one such collection, featuring “Afghan Girl” and many other portraits he’s taken all over the world. View the rest of the series and many other great photos at Steve McCurry’s Blog.

  • This Tiny House Is Only 84 Square Feet [7 Photos]

    Ten years ago, after a trip to Guatemala and some health problems, Dee Williams reexamined her life and made some drastic changes. She sold her three-bedroom house in Portland, Oregon, built an 84-square-foot home on a trailer, and drove it to her friends’ yard in Olympia, Washington. She has just 305 possessions in her tiny home. There is no refrigerator or oven or even running water. She has a sink and a toilet but no shower. There are lights that run on solar power and a propane stove with one burner. The upstairs is a loft with just enough room for a bed. Over the last decade, Williams has become a big voice in the world of tiny house living and has published a book about her life. It looks like it could be a neat way to live for a little while, but could you do it permanently? Read more about Dee Williams at the New York Times.

  • The Ladies Of The 1964 New York World’s Fair [26 Photos]

    On April 22, 1964, the New York World’s Fair opened in Flushing Meadows Corona Park in Queens. The fair was not actually sanctioned by the Bureau of International Expositions because rental fees were charged for exhibitors and because it ran twice as long as is allowed, but who cares? This is America, and we do what we want. Over 51 million people visited over the two six-month operating seasons, including the ladies you see below. Be careful with your ogling, though—these ladies could be your grandmother!

  • 22 Before And After Shots Reveal How Much Of Your Favorite Movies Are CGI

    When you’re watching a movie, you expect monsters and spaceships, and all manner of things that don’t actually exist to be computer generated. However, with the quality of contemporary visual effects, filmmakers are relying on computers more and more and real life less and less. Thanks to computer generated images, a director realize his exact vision for every scene. Buildings, trees, weather—all can be manipulated with computers and blended in seamlessly. Pretty soon, we won’t even need actors. Won’t be so smug then, will you George Clooney? Check out more photos at Business Insider.

  • The Incredible World Of…Snails? [16 Photos]

    Snails don’t get a lot of love, and one look at them pretty much tells you why. They basically appear to be boogers with antennae and a shell on their back. In a world of kittens and puppies, the snail rating on the cuteness scale is about a negative 12. But that’s only because we never get a good look at their lives up close. Ukraine-based artist and photographer Vyacheslav Mishchenko aims to change that with his photographs showing the world the way snails see it, with giant berries, treacherous raindrops, and hardcore make-out sessions perched atop flower petals. Check out more of Vyacheslav Mishchenko’s photos on Facebook and maybe think twice before the next time you eat a snail, not just because they’re sort of cute after all, but also, they just don’t taste that great.

  • 14 Amazing Color Photos From The Late 1800s

    Between 1888 and 1924, the Detroit Photographic Company produced these color tinted images of black and white and sepia photographs to be sold as postcards. Graphic designer, photographer, and collector Marc Walter has amassed one of the largest private collections of these vintage travel photographs and he recently joined forces with documentarian and author Sabine Arque for a 612-page hardcover titled “An American Odyssey.” The book features photos from New York’s bustling immigrant neighborhoods in the East to Gold Rush towns of the West. Order “An American Odyssey” in May for $200.

  • 32 HQ Photos Of Ireland’s Wild Atlantic Way

    The Wild Atlantic Way, the world’s longest coastal driving route, stretches over 1500 miles of Ireland’s west coast. There’s plenty to do along the way, with 159 “Discovery Points” marked along the route. Western Ireland is also home to some of the best whale watching in the world. But more than anything, the best part of the drive is the endless awe-inspiring vistas the country has to offer. For more info and other great photos, check out the Wild Atlantic Way on Facebook.

  • 25 Creepy Easter Bunnies To Ruin Your Holiday Weekend

    Legend has it that the Easter Bunny was created to teach kids to stay away from the filthy, disease carrying vermin. What better way to warn kids of the dangers of rabbit fever than a man in an ill-fitting, foul smelling costume forcing children to sit on his lap while blinding them with flashbulbs? The poor treatment of children during Easter was actually addressed at the 1949 Geneva Conference, and although deemed cruel, it was also found to be necessary to limit exposure to E. coli. The tradition continues to this day, where children can still be found trying in vain to escape the clutches of the awful Easter Bunny only to be rewarded with a hollow chocolate facsimile of the creature to devour on Sunday morning. Just don’t let them eat real rabbits. The lack of fatty acids in the meat causes rabbit starvation. Devious bastards.

  • Dad Photoshops Sons Onto Classic Album Covers [17 Photos]

    Awesome dad Lance Underwood takes pictures of his two sons, Taj and Amar, and Photoshops them onto classic jazz, hip-hop, and rock album covers. Not only do the kids get an amazing wardrobe out of the project, like tiny versions of the hip musicians they stand in for, they also will have the coolest photo album to share when they’re all grown up. Be sure to check out the rest of the photos at QT Albums.

  • 50 Years Of The Ford Mustang [51 Photos]

    50 years ago today, Ford introduced the Mustang at the 1964 New York’s World Fair. It’s unique shape, a sporty coupe with a long hood and short rear deck, was the first of the “pony car” class, including such other iconic cars as the Camaro and Firebird. The Mustang has been in continuous production for 50 years and is showing no signs of stopping. The 2015 Mustang, the sixth generation of the model, recently appeared atop the Empire State Building to celebrate the car’s 50th birthday in the city where it all began at the New York Auto Show. We’ve chosen a a Mustang for every year of the last half-century to include in the gallery below. Which is your favorite?

  • New Meme Alert: Hustle Man [25 Photos]

    The ultra-popular Humans of New York always features a picture of someone on the street of NYC along with a touching if not overly-sappy diatribe about lost love, or finding inspiration, or some other nonsense. Until today. Today we were gifted Hustle Man. His words were succinct yet powerful: ”I’m Hustle Man! That’s all you need to know.” Hustle Man is our new hero and we’re not the only ones. These pictures have been popping up in the Facebook comments for Humans of New York over the last few hours. Check out more of them on Facebook. 

  • 40 Photos Of Russians With Their Rugs

    Back in the days of the Soviet Union, simple construction methods led to people often needing to hang rugs on the walls to keep in the warmth and keep out the noise. The rugs came to be seen as somewhat of a status symbol and are still found on walls in Russia today. In this age of selfies and social media, they serve the added benefit of being a sweet backdrop. Need to show off your guns? Do it in front of the rug! Need to look sexy while holding a pet? Nothing hotter than laying in front of a rug! Need a backdrop that contrasts your new Adidas tracksuit? That rug on the wall will certainly make it pop! Hey, at least it’s better than a Bob Marley poster.

  • Photographing Life From High Up In The Air [15 HQ Photos]

    Pilot and aerial photographer Alex MacLean travels the world, capturing photos from high up in his Flight Design CT two-seater. Trained as an architect, MacLean has a knack for recognizing patterns that are all but invisible to those of us stuck on terra firma. His work has been exhibited all over North America, Europe, and Asia and appears in countless private, public, and university collections. For more of incredible photographs, visit Alex MacLean Aerial Photographer.

  • Behind The Scenes Photos Of James Franco, Jason Segel, And Seth Rogen When They Were Teens [17 Photos]

    From 1999-2000, NBC aired “Freaks and Geeks,” a high school comedy-drama set in the early 80s. The series was created by Paul Feig, who went on to direct “Bridesmaids,” and produced by Judd Apatow, who has made pretty much every comedy blockbuster of the last 15 years. The short-lived show is most remembered, though, for the “Freaks,” including James Franco, Jason Segel, and Seth Rogen. It was the first time many of us saw these actors, and nobody could guess the huge stars they would become after appearing on a show that lasted just 18 episodes.

  • A Look At The Navy’s New $3 Billion Ship, USS Zumwalt [11 Photos]

    On April 12, the US Navy christened its lates ship, the USS Zumwalt. It is the first of 3 ships in the new DDG category of destroyers, featuring the latest technology at a cost of over $3 billion each. Initially offering two 155mm AGSs equivalent to 12 155mm howitzers, it is anticipated that one AGS will be switched out with the Navy’s awesome new rail gun beginning in the 2020s. And despite being 40% larger than the ubiquitous Arleigh Burke-class destroyer, the new class of DDG is incredibly stealthy. The radar signature of the ship is akin to a fishing boat and the sound levels are about the same as the common Los Angeles-class submarines. All 3 DDG ships should be launched by the end of the decade, ushering in a new era of Naval warfare.

  • Have A Space Party Celebration For Yuri’s Night [12 Photos]

    April 12, 1961 marked the monumental occasion of cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin’s first manned spaceflight. On that day 20 years later, NASA launched the first space shuttle. To commemorate the importance of April 12, Yuri’s Night was established in 2001 to encourage parties and gatherings aimed at entertaining while celebrating these milestones and encouraging a new generation of space explorers. In 2011, on the 50th anniversary of Gagarin’s flight, over 100,000 people attended 567 official events in 75 countries on all 7 continents. If you still haven’t made plans, find a party near you on the official Yuri’s Night site or use these photos from past events to give you ideas on planning your own. Check out more Yuri’s Night photos on Flickr.

  • George Bush Uses Wikipedia For Artistic Inspiration [12 Photos]

    Everyone’s a critic, especially critics. Last week, former President George W. Bush unveiled portraits of world leaders he’s painted since leaving office. He’s no Chuck Close, eschewing realism for a more grade-school art class aesthetic, but his work does have a folksy quaintness about them. But leave it to an art critic to point out that Bush based his paintings on photos from Wikipedia and the top results on Google Images. You can read Greg Allen’s critique of the process on his blog. It seems that by tearing apart Bush’s art and the “message” of his methods, it just legitimizes him as an artist and not an old dude who just wants to paint to piss away some time. And deeper-meaning or not, that wonky-eyed Merkel gives me the willies.

  • Smithsonian Photo Contest Finalists Announced [25 HQ Photos]

    The photo editors at Smithsonian have announced the finalists for their 11th Annual Photo Contest. Over 50,000 submissions were whittled down to just 60 finalists. 10 photos were chosen for the following categories: Natural, Travel, People, Americana, Altered, and Mobile. We chose 25 of our favorites to showcase below, but you can view the other finalists and vote for your favorites at Smithsonian.

  • Extreme Close-Ups Of Insects Look Like Aliens [17 Photos]

    Indonesia-based photographer Yudy Sauw takes extreme close-up photos of insects, getting as close as 10 centimeters away, to capture details we could never see with the naked eye. Patience is of the utmost importance since the slightest movement can cause the insects to flee, ruining the shot. In the end, it certainly pays off, with Sauw capturing incredible photos such as tiny water droplets on a fly’s head and the fangs of a tiger beetle. For more great insect photos, check out Yudy Sauw on 500px.

  • The Ridiculous Dogs Of Intergroom 2014 [12 Photos]

    More than 3,000 dog and cat groomers from around the world descended upon New Jersey last weekend for Intergroom 2014, one of the largest conventions of its kind. Attendees were offered seminars and demonstrations of new products, but, mot important, was the competition. The following dogs from the Creative Challenge competition illustrate the talent and bizarre creativity of the best groomers the world has to offer. Do you think they have a creative competition for cats, too? I wouldn’t mind watching the calamity of such an event unfold…

  • The Hipster Fashion Of Namibia [24 Photos]

    At first glance, the people in these photos, what with their vintage clothing, trilby hats, pocket watches, pipes, and antique luggage, could pose for your regular Brooklyn hipster. But then you notice the background, and that sure ain’t Williamsburg. These pictures come from the African nation of Namibia, where Loux the Vintage Guru, a designer, stylist, and tailor, is leading a sharp-dressed fashion revolution. Loux gives old clothes new life and is spreading his vintage aesthetic with the help of a group of like-minded designers and stylists form Johannesburg known as Khumbula. For more of these great photos, check out Loux the Vintage guru on Tumblr.

  • The Mercury 7: America’s First Astronauts [22 HQ Photos]

    On April 9, 1959, NASA announced the original seven men chosen to be astronauts for the manned spaceflights of the Mercury program. Dubbed the Mercury 7, the group was made up of Alan Shepard, Gus Grissom, John Glenn, Scott Carpenter, Wally Schirra, Gordon Cooper, and Deke Slayton. NASA originally planned for an open competition to find its first astronauts, but President Eisenhower, ever a stick in the mud, insisted that they all be test pilots. Due to the size of the Mercury capsule, candidates could be no taller than 5’11″ and weigh less than 180 pounds. Other requirements were age under 40, a bachelor’s degree, and at least 1500 hours of flying time. More than 500 initially applied, and after rounds of testing, both physical and mental, the group was whittled down to 18. The final 7 were chosen because of their genius-level IQs and their ability to function both as a team and solo. Between them, the 7 flew on all classes of manned NASA spacecraft from the Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, and Space Shuttle programs. With the exception, of Gus Grissom, who was tragically killed in the 1967 Apollo 1 fire, they all lived long lives well into retirement more »

  • Spectacular Landscapes Around The World [20 Photos]

    The United Kingdom-based Society of International Nature and Wildlife Photographers recently held a one-off Spectacular Landscapes competition. Hundreds of photographers entered, and those voted the 20 best are presented in the gallery. For more info on the competition and current open competitions, check out Society of International Nature and Wildlife Photographers.

  • Incredible Street Art Portraits From MTO [21 Photos and Video]

    Originally from France then relocating to Germany, street artist MTO has created incredible works all over the world. His giant black and white portraits often feature film and music icons, such as Robert De Niro, Jim Jarmusch, Jimi Hendrix, and Bob Dylan. The portraits, averaging between 2 to 3 meters tall, take MTO up to 5 hours to complete. Last year, he also made a documentary titled “FL” about his experiences with the controversy surrounding a mural he painted in Sarasota, Florida. You can check out the film a the end of the photostream. For more of MTO’s work, head over to his Facebook page. 

  • Incredible Macro Photography Of Coral [20 HQ Photos]

    Not only is Daniel Stoupin a PhD student at the University of Queensland reseaerching marine biology, he also happens to be a avid nature photographer and videographer. His science background led to and interest in macro photography and the revelation of the diverse and complex life we miss out on with the naked eye. For this collection, corals were illuminated with a full-spectrum lamp to bring out fluorescent colors not visible under white light. For more photos form this series and other amazing collections, check out Daniel Stoupin’s Microworlds Photography.

  • American Food Aisles From Around The World [15 Photos]

    Go into pretty much any supermarket in America and you’ll find the “ethnic foods” aisle which undoubtedly stocks all sorts of Mexican food, and, depending on your neighborhood demographics, British, Indian, Korean, Estonian, etc. But if you go to another country will you find “American” food in a special aisle? Hell yeah, you will! And apparently American food to everyone else is either high sodium or high sugar junk food. It’s good to know that wherever you are in the world, you will be able to buy marshmallow fluff and peanut butter. What’s that, garcon? You want me to eat escar-huh? Ain’t that a snail? No thanks, dude, I got me some fluffernutters.

  • The Hottest Pictures On…eBay? [10 Photos]

    The secret of selling on eBay revealed! Other motorcycle part sellers hate him. What does “babenotincluded” do to make a ton of money on the auction site? It’s simple, really. All you need to be a successful seller is competitive pricing, accurate and detailed descriptions, pictures of the product from various angles, and barely-clothed babes handling your wares. And it really works! I don’t even own a motorcycle or know what any of this stuff is, but I’ve been ordering all morning. By the end of the day I’ll have enough stuff to open my own eBay store. Now I just need to get some models. Check out more great deals on motorcycle parts (and photos, if that’s you’re thing, you dirty devil you) at eBay.

  • Russian Team Builds Functional Replica WW2 Tank [22 Photos and Video]

    What’s that? You once put a radiator in a 1985 Oldsmobile Delta 88? That’s cool. These Russian dudes just got together one time and rebuilt a World War II German VI Tiger tank. But your mechanical skills are impressive, too, I guess. The functional 1:1 replica tank was built in 2011 for a movie for Russia’s Mosfilm studio. The entire set of over 60 photos can be found on Imgur. Also, check out the video of the initial test drive at the end of the photostream. 

  • Berlin Wall Graffiti In The 80s [12 Photos]

    Despite the tense political climate that literally divided the city, West Berlin was a destination for many artists and musicians in the 80s. French street artist Thierry Noir moved to the city in 1982 and became the first artist to use the Berlin Wall as a canvas when he began painting it on a whim in 1984. Noir spent 5 years covering the wall in bright imagery that was a stark contrast to the infamous wall separating democratic West Berlin and Communist East Berlin. The wall came down in 1989, and now, 25 years later, Thierry Noir is having his first solo exhibition at London’s Howard Griffin Gallery. Prints based on Noir’s Berlin Wall painting will be exhibited alongside photographs and video from his work in the 80s. For more info on Thierry Noir and the exhibit, check out the Howard Griffin Gallery.

 
 
 
 
 
 

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