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  • Amazing Photos From The Last Eruption Of Mt. Vesuvius In 1944 [20 Photos]

    Italy’s Mount Vesuvius, best known for its eruption in AD 79 that led to the destruction of Pompeii and killed an estimated 16,000 people, is still considered one of the world’s most dangerous volcanoes. 3 million people now live near Vesuvius, making it the most densely populated volcano on Earth. It last erupted in 1944, making it the only volcano to erupt in Europe in the last 100 years. From March 18 to March 23, 1944, lava flowed from the volcano, destroying nearby villages. At that time, the United States Army Air Forces 340th Bomb Group was stationed in Pompeii. The photos come from the USAAF men who were there at the time. For more photos and stories from the eyewitnesses, check out War Wings Art.

  • Indonesian Volcanic Eruption As Seen From Space

    On Friday, Mount Kelud, a volcano on Indonesia’s most populated island, Java, erupted and we shared photographs of the destruction as 100,000 people were evacuated. The ash was propelled out of the volcano more than 13 miles high. 4 deaths have now been confirmed and 56,000 people remain displaced. The eruption could be heard 125 miles away and was captured from space in these satellite photos from NASA.

  • 100,000 Evacuate As Volcano Erupts In Indonesia [20 Photos]

    100,000 people on Indonesia’s most populated island, Java, have been evacuated due to Friday’s eruption of Mount Kelud. The volcanic eruption has blasted ash and debris 12 miles into the air and could be heard as far as 125 miles away. The evacuation measures of the population within 6 miles of the volcano proved successful, with only 3 dead from the eruption. The last eruption of Mount Kelud, in 1990, resulted in 30 dead and hundreds injured. Displaced villagers have begun returning home and many are now gathering the ash and selling it, as it is a sought after fertilizer for crops. In fact, the fertile soil around the volcano is the reason why villages thrive in such a dangerous place.

  • Volcanic Eruptions as Seen from Space [16 Photos]

    When viewing conditions are favorable, astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS) can take unusual and striking images of the Earth. Just last month the ISS provided a view of an eruption plume emanating from Kliuchevskoi, one of the many active volcanoes on the Kamchatka Peninsula. The nadir views—looking straight down—acquired by most satellites tend to flatten the landscape and reduce our sense of three-dimensional topography. In contrast, this photo was taken from the ISS with an oblique viewing angle that gives a strong sense of three dimensions, which are also accentuated by the shadows cast by the volcanic peaks. The result is a view similar to what you might see from a low-altitude airplane. The image was taken when the ISS was located over a ground position more than 1,500 kilometers (900 miles) to the southwest. This stunning photo inspired us to find a few more like it.

  • Trippy Volcanic Lightning [6 Photos]

    Photographer Martin Rietze went on an epic adventure to Japan and caught a spectacular, once in a lifetime series of pictures of the Sakurajima Vulcano, as it spewed a hellish mix of smoke, fire, lava bombs and electrifying lightning. Rietze’s balls of steel landed one of the top honors in photography, the top photo on NASA’s Astronomy Picture of the Day earlier this week. 

  • Photo of the Day: Volcanic Lightning

    This photo from National Geographic shows the Eyjafjallajökull volcano’s ash plume, which roiled air travel in the spring of 2010. The lightening called a “dirty thunderstorm” occurs when rock and ice particles loosed by exploding magma collide in the atmosphere.