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  • Stanley Kubrick Captured Chicago In These Awesome 1940s Photos [43 Photos]

    Before becoming the brilliant director of such films as 2001: A Space Odyssey, The Shining, and A Clockwork Orange, Stanley Kubrick was a photographer and photojournalist. In the 1940s he worked for Look,a competitor of Life magazine. In 1949, the magazine sent him to Chicago for a story on the city. Although the magazine is long gone, the photos have been preserved and digitized by the Library of Congress. Check out those incredible photos of the professional wrestling match featuring the great Gorgeous George! And that lingerie model? What a tomato!

  • Download And Build Your Halloween Mask This Year

    Looking to do a little something different for Halloween this year and not support those fat cats in the novelty industry? Or are you some do-gooder who is looking for way to recycle your old cardboard boxes? Or are you just a cheapskate? Whatever your reason, this year you can try your hand at making your own mask. And don’t worry if your body is lacking in a creative bone, for Wintercroft Masks will sell you simple plans for just a little over $7. These masks may not look like the scariest creations, but they’re a great starting point. Although you could leave them in their simple, pixel-esque state, we can also see how these are a great starting point for talented painters or sculptors. With proper decoration and or maybe a little added paper mache or plaster, these could be some incredible creations. Some of our favorites are below but plenty more are available at Etsy and Wintercroft Masks.

  • Thirty-Three-Hit Wonder [Link]

    Billy Joel’s first album came out over 40 years ago and he hasn’t released a new pop album in over 20 years, but the Piano Man is still going strong. Catch up with the 65-year-old performer in this New Yorker interview at his Long Island home before a Madison Square Garden performance last month.

  • An Interactive Slide Gallery Showing the Ever Changing Landscapes of NYC

    There’s just no city that changes landscapes quite like New York. It seems like every decade the facades of store fronts change with gentrification of even the most historic of neighborhoods. Graphic designer, Paul Sahner has been snapping pictures of the streets for almost 10 years. He’s posted his photos on his blog NYC Grid then matched them with old pictures from the Library of Congress or Flickr to showcase the transformation of the city’s landmarks and streets. Here is an interactive slide gallery showing the changing landscapes of nyc. Manhattan Bridge Arch Photo: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, HABS/ Paul Sahner, NYC Grid Mott Street Photo: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, HABS/ Paul Sahner, NYC Grid Bryant Park Photo: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division/ Paul Sahner, NYC Grid 8th Avenue/14th Street Photo: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, HABS/ Paul Sahner, NYC Grid First Avenue on the Upper East Side Photo: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, HABS/ Paul Sahner, NYC Grid St. Bart’s Church Photo: Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, HABS/ Paul Sahner, NYC Grid The Chapel of the Good Shepherd Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, more »

  • New Episodes Of “Friends” Via The Sims 4…Sort Of

    Just because it ended 10 years ago, that’s no reason why we shouldn’t get to see new episodes of Friends. Oh wait, that’s a great reason why we don’t get new episodes. But through the magic of surreal life simulator The Sims 4 and Friends fans with too much time on their hands, we can still watch the inane New York adventures of Ross, Chandler, Monica, Rachel, Joey, and Phoebe. Ian Roach is a master when it comes to recreating sitcoms int he world of The Sims. He’s created characters and sets based on shows such as Seinfeld, The Golden Girls, and Arrested Development, but it was his Friends creations that sparked the imagination of Vulture. They asked Roach to run simulations of a bunch of wacky scenarios, including who would pee on the floor first if no bathrooms were available and how long would it take for Joey and Chandler to fall in love when locked in a room. Here’s a sample of the results, but you can check out the full story at Vulture.

  • More Anamorphic Street Art To Hurt Your Brain [21 Photos]

    We love all kinds of street art, but there’s something especially neat about anamorphic pieces. In case you’re a philistine who’s not familiar with the term, anamorphic art involves a distorted projection that when viewed form a certain angle produces an image that appears three-dimensional. Those popular sidewalk chalk art pieces from artists such as Kurt Wenner are a perfect example of anamorphosis. And when the illusion comes together, these particular works are especially spectacular. UK-based street artist Replete often creates anamorphic works using adjoining walls but his most unique pieces involve the use of clear cling film as an almost invisible canvas. Some of our favorites are in the gallery but you can check out more street art, paintings, and prints at Replete Graffiti.

  • 14 Brilliant DIY Pumpkin Hacks Everyone Should Know

    Halloween is right around the corner which means you are the lady friend will probably be headed to the patch in search of that award winning pumpkin. If you thought Pumpkin Kegs were the only cool thing you could do this fall think again. Here are a few carving tricks that will save you time and give you the coolest Jack-o-Lantern on the block.

  • The Truth Behind Iconic Album Covers. Sort of.

    Back in the days of CDs and vinyls album covers we’re just as important as the music inside of them, triggering a melody and feeling after growing cose to some of your favorites. Each piece of cover art was meticulously created to portray a message to the masses, but today, with digital downloads taking the majority of sales for bands, album cover art is all but lost. Aptitude takes a look at some of the most iconic album covers over the years and puts their own spin on them by revealing ‘the bigger picture’. From quirky reveals to future happenings, from Justin Bieber to The Beatles, click the album covers below and reveal all.

  • See The Making Of The World’s Most Complex Watch [Video]

    To celebrate its 175th anniversary, Swiss watch manufacturer Patek Philippe has created the world’s most complicated watch. No, it’s not some computer-powered smartwatch, the 5175R Grandmaster Chime Watch is actually fully mechanical, made up of 1580 parts. The double-faced watch can be worn to showcase the time and sonnerie or the full instantaneous perpetual calendar. Most incredible of all is the grand and petite sonnerie, with settings for chimes at the hours and quarter hours. The watch, limited to just seven pieces, one of which will go directly to the Patek Philippe Museum, took 8 years to develop. Unfortunately, all six watches have already been reserved by collectors. But at a price of over $2.5 million, you probably couldn’t have afforded one anyway.

  • The Avengers: Age of Ultron Teaser Looks Nothing Short of Epic

    The Avengers are back this time trying to take on Ultron (played by James Spader) a highly intelligent robot from Marvel Comics who is bent on destroying humanity so as to replace humans with machines, and is the archenemy of the Avengers and Hank Pym, his creator. Iron Man has a new suit that looks like a suit big enough to fight the Hulk which he does, Thor looks scared, Captain America looks defeated and the Avengers look all but defeated in this trailer. We have a feeling they survive. Marvel’s “Avengers: Age of Ultron,” in theaters May 1, 2015!

  • This Is The Greatest Use Of An Ice Dispenser Since…Ice [Video]

    Yesterday a Redditor posted pictures of his ice dispenser that he filled with candy so instead of ice cubes, you get an assortment of frozen treats. But in typical Internet fashion, nobody believed that it would actually work. Whereas most posters, when confronted with the righteous cynicism of folks on the Internet, would delete their post and dare never to post anything again (until they make a new username), this brave OP created a video to prove the functionality of his brilliant lifehack. But frozen Starbursts?? Does this guy own stock in Dentistry Inc.?

  • Using Technology To Overcome Golf “Mis-hits”

    Did you know that 76% of all iron shots are mis-hits struck outside the center of the face. Yes, you heard that right. Considering the face of the club is where the fastest ball speeds are produced this might explain why you shoot like you and Sergio Garcia shoots like Sergio Garcia. The fact that nearly 8 out of 10 golf shots are “mis-hits” led Taylor Made to develop a revolutionary new technology, designed to improve consistency and distance. No golfer is perfect, not even the best players in the world hit the center of the club every time. So their “Face Slot Technology,” available on the RSi line of clubs starting November 14, 2014, provides greater consistency across the face, giving players improved performance on mis-hits. This technology won’t turn you into a pro overnight but it’ll certainly make bachelor party outings a lot less frustrating. Photo source: sporttechie.com

  • 2014 Wildlife photographer of the Year Winners Announced

    The results are in for wildlife photographer of the year 2014 competition. The winners were announced today at London’s Natural History Museum and the the winner is American photographer Michael Nichols with his image of five female lions at rest with their cubs in Tanzania’s Serengeti National Park. A collection of the list of category winners were announced as well. Black and White category winner and Overall Wildlife Photographer of the Year winner The last great picture by Michael ‘Nick’ Nichols (USA) Mammals category winner The mouse, the moon and the mosquito by Alex Badyaev (Russia/USA) Plants and Fungi category winner Glimpse of the underworld by Christian Vizl (Mexico) Photograph- Christian Vizl/2014 WPY Invertebrate category winner Night of the deadly lights by Ary Bassous (Brazil) World in our Hands category winner The price they pay by Bruno D’Amicis (Italy) World in our Hands category finalist The longline lottery by Rodrigo Friscione Wyssmann (Mexico) Natural Design category winner Cardinal sparks by Patrik Bartuska (Czech Republic) Photograph- Patrik Bartuska/2014 WPY Earth’s Environments category winner Apocalypse by Francisco Negroni (Chile) Birds category finalist Touché by Jan van der Greef (The Netherlands) 10 Years and under winner and Overall young Wildlife Photographer of the more »

  • Back to Where it All Began. Important First Steps for the Internet

    Oh how far the world wide web has come, in 1985 the first domain was registered, and today 271 million domain names exist. In 1992, the first photo was uploaded to the Internet and now, in 2014, 1.8 billion photos are uploaded and shared daily. This infographic by WebpageFX highlights some of the internet’s first steps toward a life we know only as normalcy today. Just think before 2005, YouTube didn’t exist. So basically the world didn’t exist before 2005.

  • KFC Korea Has Taken The Double Down Up A Notch

    When KFC first unveiled the Double Down sandwich back in 2010, it was a testament to the deep-fried opulence of ‘Murican fast food. Bacon, two kinds of cheese and secret sauce with two fried chicken fillets in place of a bun—what could be better? How about beef? KFC South Korea, who already have a Zinger Double Down MAXX with added hash brown and salsa, have now announced Zinger Double Down KING, with a hamburger patty, bacon, barbecue sauce, and a creamy black pepper sauce between two spicy fried chicken fillets. The 650-calorie sandwich is available for a limited time for 6900 won (about $6.50). Now KFC America needs to add another animal to the mix and reclaim our deep fried menagerie.

  • Real Men Wear Lucha Libre Masks [Link]

    Everyone loves the colorful masks worn by Mexico’s Lucha Libre wrestlers but there is so much more to enjoy about the Mexico’s unique take on American-style professional wrestling. The insane speed and high-flying acrobatics of the athletes makes for spectacular entertainment. Now a new TV show, Lucha Underground, takes a look at the real men behind those kooky masks.

  • Would You Eat At A Restaurant Made Of Bones? [11 Photos]

    In a modernist 1940s building in Guadalajara, Mexico you can find chef Alfonso Cadena’s new concept restaurant, Hueso. From the Spanish word for “bone,” Hueso’s walls are covered in 10,000 animal bones—a macabre twist on the old trumpets and oars and other crap on the walls at a TGI Friday’s. There are also old cooking tools mounted to the wall, but everything is the same, off-white, bone color scheme, creating an ultra-clean appearance. Hueso was designed by CADENA+Asociados and it looks like a great place to eat. Just leave your PETA pals behind.

  • Cooking With Beer: 10 Beer-Based Recipes [Infographic]

    Beer is great. It tastes good…you can drink it…it can get you drunk…what’s there not to love? But it’s important that you eat food, too—especially when you’re drinking. If only you could eat your beer. Turn that alcoholic frown upside down, because beer can be used in all sorts of food! With soup, bread, entree, and cookie recipes, you can have beer infused with every course. And cooking it means the alcohol goes away so you can drink plenty of beer while you eat without worrying about overdoing it. Now would someone be nice enough to make us some beer and cheddar soup on this cold and rainy day?

  • Another Teen Daredevil Is Scaling Skyscrapers [11 Photos]

    What is it with kids these days? When we were young, the only thing we scaled was the basketball pole on the playground when our ball got wedged between the hoop and backboard. We’d shimmy up those 10 feet and that was plenty, thank you very much. But now, these kids need more extreme pursuits. Instead of “Dunk Hunt,” they play “Grand Theft Auto.” Instead of inline skates, they have hoverboards. And instead of climbing basketball poles, they scale Hong Kong skyscrapers. Andrej Ciesielski is the latest young daredevil. The 17-year-old from Munich, Germany, recently scaled Hong Kong’s Yat Chau International Plaza and the China Online Building without any safety equipment. Joined by Alexander Remnev (Russian…no surprise there), the entire adventure was caught on camera. And now that he’s conquered Hong Kong, Andrej wants to travel to New York City. Do you think he’d be welcome at 432 Park Avenue?

  • This Commercial Is An Incredible Ski Film

    Filming athletes in LED suits is all the rage right now, and we’re just fine with that. It makes for awesome video and which what Philips was hoping for when they teamed with Swedish agency Ahlstrand & Wållgren and filmmakers Sweetgrass Productions to create “Afterglow,” a short film to promote Philips’ color-backlit Ambilight televisions. The 12-minute long video was filmed at Golden Alpine Holidays in Aleyska, Alaska. The slopes were lit up with brilliant colors while the team of professional skiers wore suits comprised of thousands of LEDs. This is the sort of advertising we can really get into.

  • Why Do College Athletes Continue To Sign Autographs For Money? Because, Why Not?

    Jerseys.  Pictures.  Flags.  Babies. Go ahead and ask the 20 year old version of me for a few signatures, I’d sign anything if the price is right. I even mean a “$1 Bob” bid on a vinyl gazebo kind of Price is Right. When I was 20 Bob Barker was still neutering pets on TV, the Big 10 Conference had 11 schools instead of 14 (in college counting is no longer required), and reading tweets from athletes was not considered a scheduled segment on Sportscenter.  I didn’t possess the clout and notoriety that college football athletes have today.  Unless you’re counting an open container and a lifestyle detrimental to my liver I didn’t possess anything.  Whether they were proud alumni seeking an autograph, a memorabilia agency looking to cash in, or Bank of America card services: no one wanted my signature. There is seemingly an annual accusation of NCAA rule violations by some of college football’s biggest stars relating to the art of signing their name.  Jameis Winston.  Todd Gurley.  Johnny used-to-play Football.  The memorabilia demand is clearly there and as for the athletes there’s more we know of, and likely far more we don’t. In addition to playing football, more »

  • 24 Teams With Longer Championship Droughts Than The Kansas City Royals [Original Infographic]

    People are going crazy over the fact that the Kansas City Royals haven’t played a World Series game in 29 years. But 20% of the teams in Major League Baseball, and nearly two dozen additional professional teams from the NBA, NFL and NHL, haven’t played in championship game on over 29 years. With some, looking at you Chicago Cubs, feeling the pain of a drought that is decades long.

  • Florida’s Record-setting Hurricane Drought Is Creating A Terrifying Scenario

    Florida has gone 3,270 days without a hurricane – nearly nine years and, by far, the longest stretch on record (the next longest streak is 5 seasons from 1980-1984, in records dating back to 1851). Meanwhile, the Sunshine state’s population and development have boomed. Florida is long overdue for a destructive hurricane and has never had so many people and so much property in the way. This dangerous state of affairs is compounded by the potential for complacency and lack of recent experience. When hurricanes don’t strike over such a long period of time, some people may be lulled into a false sense of security and/or forget how horrible hurricanes can be. And then there are newcomer Floridians who haven’t ever had to endure a hurricane. Weather.com notes that more than 1 million people have moved to Florida since Wilma in 2005, the last hurricane to hit the state. “That’s potentially 1 million people who are inexperienced with the impacts of hurricanes and tropical storms and lack the experience boarding up a home, cleaning out a flooded home or battling mandatory evacuation traffic,” Weather.com writes. It’s not a matter of if but when an active cycle of hurricanes returns to Florida. more »

  • How Does Rob Dyrdek Manage To Do It All? [Infographic]

    Rob Dyrdek has gone from skateboarding star to a serious money maker for brands and advertisers. For example, Rob’s show “Ridiculousness” has raked in $183.6 million in national advertising revenue, the largest amount on MTV & MTV2 in the last 52 weeks. In the following infographic stats like these accompany additional information on how Rob has impacted companies like MTV and Street League Skateboarding globally with a breakdown of how this celebrity entrepreneur spends his time and on what.

  • ‘Dating’ vs. ‘Married': How Text Messages Change Over Time [Link]

    For better or for worse, texting looks like its here to stay, keeping you and your significant other in constant contact with each other. Aside from a brief respite while on the subway or driving through a tunnel, you’ll always be able to tell each other how in love you are and how badly you miss each other. Until the novelty of new love wears off, anyway. And once you get married, the text messages are totally different.

  • 45 Photos Celebrating The Life Of Jack Kerouac

    On the night of October 20, 1969, in St. Petersburg, Florida, Jack Kerouac was drinking whiskey while scribbling notes for a novel about his father when he suddenly felt ill. He went to the bathroom where he began to throw up blood. An ambulance was called and he was rushed to the hospital, where emergency surgery was performed, but to no avail. At 5:15 AM on October 21, Kerouac was dead. Just 47 years old, a life of alcohol abuse led to the cirrhosis and internal hemorrhage that claimed his life. Born in Lowell, Massachusetts in 1922, Kerouac was not only a bright child, reading anything he could get his hands on, he was also a gifted athlete. In fact, it was football that brought Kerouac to New York City when he received a scholarship to play the sport at Columbia University. But clashes with famed coach Lout Little and a distaste for the stuffy academic life led Kerouac to drop out of school and join the US Merchant Marine. While at sea, Kerouac wrote his first novel, The Sea is My Brother, which would not be published until 2011. When he returned to New York, he found himself spending more »

  • What Today’s Most Popular Websites Looked Like When They Launched [Interactive Slide]

    Since the mid ’90s the internet has made huge leaps of progress toward a direction catered toward websites designed for a limitless array of resolution ratios and dimensions. Mobile, tablet and desktop are all equally a part of every day web browsing, which means the most popular sites on the internet have to be optimized just write. Simple and responsive is the way of the world today, but let’s not forget about ads. Oh so many ads. Take a look at this then and now interactive slideshow of the most popular websites then and now. Facebook Twitter Google Mashable AOL ESPN Yahoo! YouTube LinkedIn Yelp Huffington Post WhiteHouse.gov Tumblr BuzzFeed RSVLTS Weather.com

  • Max Landis Wrote A Terrible 400-page Super Mario Bros. Script…But At Least The Concept Art Is Cool

    Max Landis is no stranger to great film making. His father directed such classics as Animal House, Blues Brothers, and Trading Places, while Max himself wrote the script for 2012’s Chronicle. But Max was a mature 27-year-old by the time Chronicle was made, having had time to hone his writing skills on, oh, I don’t know, maybe a 436-page epic about the Super Mario Bros. When Max was just 19, he wrote the epic script featuring characters from all the Super Mario games, including Super Mario RPG, along with the cast from the Donkey Kong Country series. At the Hollywood norm of one minute per page, this movie would have been over 7 hours long, or 5 hours and 20 minutes longer than the unwatchable Super Mario Bros. from 1993. You can download a copy of the script at Max Landis Writes and see how terrible it is for yourself. Or you can just look at this great concept art from Darren Calvert and create your own storyline in your head. It probably won’t be any worse that Landis’s script and will undoubtedly be much shorter.

  • A complete list of every president’s favorite drink [Link]

    Just because the President of the United States is the most powerful man in the world, it doesn’t mean that he doesn’t enjoy a drink every now and then. 67% of American men are drinkers, and those that imbibe average 6.2 drinks per week. So it only makes sense that more than a few of our presidents have been drinkers. Check out these facts about the drinking habits of every president and be amazed at how many of them enjoyed Madeira. Jeez, you’d think we had a bunch of Romantic poets for president the first hundred years.

  • Felipe Pantone Takes Tagging To A New Level [23 Photos]

    Argentinia-born Felipe Pantone has been painting nonstop since discovering street art at the age of 12. After moving to Valencia, Spain, Pantone began experimenting with the alphabet and typography, working with the D.O.C.S. crew and later the Ultra Boyz. His name can now be found in cities all over the world, painted in various styles that elevate graffiti tagging from ugly nuisance vandalism to incredible artistic masterpieces. The photos in this gallery come from Pantone’s “Kinetic Mundi” series, with pieces in Asia, Europe, South America, and the United States. Check out more from the series and other awesome work at Felipe Pantone.

  • This Skate Video Has Amazing Cinematography

    When we were kids, skate videos were gritty and shaky, shot on Hi8 or VHS and featuring dudes in baggy jeans and pop punk music. And we loved them. But now, with the advent of affordable HD cameras, skate videos have become beautifully shot short films with wide angles, slow motion, and, most importantly, no tiresome uses of fisheye lenses. “La République du Skateboard,” a short film from Neels Castillon, is described as “an impressionistic ode to street skateboarding.” And with incredible shots around Paris captured by a Red Epic camera, that description is most apt. For more great projects in a similar fashion, check out Neels Castillon’s website.

  • The World’s First REAL Hoverboard

    Well, here it is. The world’s first true hover board. We’ve been duped once this year with a fake hoverboard video featuring Tony Hawk and you know what they say, fool me once, shame on you, fool me twice, I’ll completely give up hope that this technology will ever actually exist. Hendo is introducing the world’s first real hoverboard and hover developer kit, they want to put the developer kit in your hands, because if you don’t have $10,000 to burn on a hover board that levitates an inch off the ground at least you can experience the actual technology. They basically give you the kit and challenge you to use their technology to build your own. Hendo has created an in-depth Kickstarter you can read for an hour. The magic behind the hoverboard lies in its four disc-shaped hover engines. These create a special magnetic field which literally pushes against itself, generating the lift which levitates our board off the ground.

  • The World Has Changed Since 1854 [Infographic]

    Not only does this infographic from 1854 contain a world map, featuring such interesting places as Russian America and the Unexplored Region of Africa, it’s also loaded with facts about the world 160 years ago. There’s a list of “Principal buildings” with the tallest on the list being the Washington Monument at 600 feet. Then there’s population of various countries, with the United States at just 23 million people. Today? Almost 300 million more. And most incredible is the list of most populous cities, featuring New York at just half a million people. Could you imagine walking around New York City with just 500,000 people? It would be like 28 Days Later. This incredible historic document comes from the David Rumsey Map Collection. Check out more than 54,000 18th and 19th century maps at the digital database. Click the graphic to view it full-sized.

 
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